A Chronological Listing of Musical Works

on American indian Subjects,

Composed Since 1608

© Michael V. Pisani, Vassar College, 2006

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AppleMark
This document is meant to accompany the book Imagining Native America in Music (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005).  This list, begun in 1993, should be understood as a work in progress.  It includes principally those works that have taken Indian subjects from the areas that are now the United States and Canada and, to some degree, musical portraits of Middle- and South-American native peoples such as the Aztecs or Incas.  Works have been entered by year of composition or by year of first performance.  Therefore, some composers’ names are likely to occur several times.  To find all entries by any single composer, you may wish to refer to the index at the end of this list.  Composers’ dates, when known, are given at the first citation only.  A bullet () within an entry serves one of two functions: 1) it indicates more than one work by that composer in the same year, or 2) it identifies undated (and unperformed) works.  In the latter case, such works are included with the composer’s first entries.  A year in brackets ([ ]) indicates an estimated date of composition.

 

While I may not be able to attend to a regular updating, I am interested in glaring omissions or any relevant new works.  So please feel free to send them to me at mipisani@vassar.edu, and I’ll see what I can do about including them.

 

What This List Does Not Contain

This list does not include the many musical settings of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poem Indian Serenade, which is an East Indian subject.  Also, it does not contain “Apache” dances or songs associated with the French artistic Société des Apaches in the early 20th century, for example, Cécile Chaminade’s Apache Dance or Richard Rodgers’s “The Poor Apache” (from the 1932 film musical Love Me Tonight).  A study of that genre demonstrates that the “Apaches” in this case have lost any meaningful connection to the North American tribe.  Furthermore, this list does not include folk tunes of unknown and untraceable origin, such as “Lost Indian.”  Finally, it does not contain musical references to native America in film, which could easily constitute yet another list this size and would still be woefully incomplete.

 

Abbreviations to library sigla used in the list:

AAS = American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts

BL = British Library, London

BN = BibliothŹque Nationale, Paris

DEVINCENT = Sam DeVincent Collection at Indiana University (online).  Web address: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/devincent.shtml

DUKE = American Memory Project (online).  Duke University.  Web address: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award97/ncdhtml/hasmhome.html

HTC = Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University (Sheet music depository)

KEFFER = Keffer Collection of Sheet Music, ca. 1790-1895, Dept. of Special Collection, University of Pennsylvania Library

LC = Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

LEVY = Lester S. Levy Sheet Music Collection, Milton S. Eisenhower Library of The Johns Hopkins University. Web address: http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/

MN = Music for the Nation series. Library of Congress. Wed address: http://rs6.loc.gov/ammem/mussmhtml/mussmhome.html

NBC Archive = National Broadcasting Corporation Library Archive, Eastman School of Music.

NYPL = New York Public Library, Research Collections, Lincoln Center

SIBLEY  = Sibley Music Library, Eastman School of Music

UAZ = University of Arizona, Tempe, University Library

WFAA Collection = University of North Texas; Music Collection of WFAA Radio Station, Dallas (ca. 1920s to 1950s; received 1960)

 

Please note: While I have used the above sources in the preparation of this list—as well as many others not cited here—the list itself is not meant to be a complete reference to locations.  Hence, the citation of sources is inconsistent.  Some works can be found in many libraries.  When the source is a manuscript, I have made every effort to indicate its location, if known.  Other major library collections consulted were the Bancroft Library (Berkeley, CA), the Newberry Library (Chicago), and the Boston Public Library, as well as the Minnesota, Iowa, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Wyoming Historical Societies.

 

I wish to thank James Kimball of Geneseo, New York, whose private sheet music collection of “Indian Songs” inspired this list, and Paul Charosh for sharing of his great knowledge of American popular song.  I would also like to thank Eli Spindel for his assistance in the editing process.

 

Indian List                                                      

An alphabetical list of composers can be found at the end of this list.

                                              

Anon.

1608

Anonymous, Ballet des Indiens.  Performed at the Court of Henry IV.  Music manuscript, BN

Anon.

1609

Anonymous, Entry No. 1 in Ballet de la Reine. Performed at the Court of Louis XIII.  No source known.

Anon.

1614

Anonymous, Mascarade de Sauvages.  Performed at the Court of Louis XIII.  Music is believed lost.

Anon.

1620

Anonymous, Ballet de L’amour de ce temps représenté par les enfans sans soucy.  No source known.

Coffin

1621

Anonymous, Ballet des Indiens.  Excerpt of music by Coffin (“Favoris des dieux et du jour”) in Airs de différents autheurs. Paris: P. Ballard, 1621.

Anon.

1626

Anonymous, No. 1 in Grand Bal de la DouairiŹre de Billebahaut.  Louvre. February, 1626

Anon.

1641

Anonymous, Entry No. 26 in Ballet De M. Le Cardinal de Richelieu.  Danced by “Americans”

Lully

1657

Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687), Les Indiens, No. 8 in Les plaisirs troublés masqurade Dance deuant Le Roy Par Monsieur Le duc de Guize lan 1657, an evening of ballet given for Louix XIV at the Louvre, Paris.  Score is unpublished but is at the Paris BibliothŹque nationale (Coll. Philidor, Vm micr 534 [36], p. 39)

Lully

1658

Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687), Music for Prince Zelmatide and the “Peruvians” in the ballet Alcidiane.

Anon.

1658

Anonymous, incidental music to W. Davenant’s play Cruelty of the Spaniards in Peru.  Music for pictorial-ballet with six entrées.  Music is lost.

Anon.

1659

Anonymous, incidental music to W. Davenant’s operatic History of Sir Francis Drake.  Only a “Simerons Dance” by Matthew Locke survives.

Cesti

1667

Marc Antonio Cesti (1623-69), Il pomo d’oro. Arioso in the prologue for “an American,” a black tenor in feathers.  First Performed: Vienna, 1667.

Lully

1669

Jean-Baptiste Lully, Flore.  Ballet de cours presented at the Louvre for King Louis XIV, 1669. No. 15 represents “The Fourth Quarter Of The World, America.”

Playford

1670

“The Indians’ Dance.”  Violin solo.  In Playford’s Apollo’s Banquet: Selected Tunes and Jiggs for the Treble Violin, p. 96.  London.

Humphrey

1675

Pelham Humphrey, “Ah, Fading Joy” from his music to John Dryden’s The Indian Emperour; or, The Conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards. Being the Sequel of the Indian Queen (1667).  Music unpublished.

Lully

1685

Lully, Le temple de la paix.  Ballet de cours.  Paris: C. Ballard, 1685.  Many reprints.

Pasquini

1690

Bernardo Pasquini (1637-1710), music to Pietro Ottobone’s libretto, Il Colombo ovvero l’India scoperta.  Performed Rome, Teatro di Tordinona, 1690.  Score in the BL.  The ballet des nations, now lost, was in the last act.

Purcell

1695

Henry Purcell (1659-95), “The Songs in The Indian Queen: as it is now Compos'd into an Opera, etc.” Adapted from the play by Sir R. Howard and J. Dryden.

Gay

1729

John Gay (1685-1732), Polly.  This was a ballad opera set in the West Indies and, featuring the character of Macheath, was intended to be a sequel to The Beggar’s Opera.  The opera features Cawwawkee, the son of the Indian-king and a “noble savage,” who, unlike the crooked Macheath and the other English, is actually an honest person (and who speak and sings in flawless English).  The Lord Chamberlain banned production of the play, and it wasn’t produced until 1777, by which time it was long out of fashion.  But the libretto was published immediately in 1729 and enjoyed some notoriety, especially among the aristocracy.

Vivaldi

1733

Antonio Vivaldi (1675-1741), Montezuma.  Dramma per musicia.  Performed Teatro di Sant’Angelo, Venice.  Score was believed lost until 2004.

Rameau

1735

Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764), Les Indes galantes, opéra-ballet in a prologue and four entrées with libretto by Louis Fuzelier First performed: Paris, 23 August 1735.

CONTENTS: 1. “Les Incas du Pérou,” 2. “Le turc généreux,” 3. Le fleurs,” 4. “Les sauvages.”  [Note: “Les sauvages” was added the following year, 1736]

Rousseau

1741

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-78), La Découverte du Nouveau Monde.  “Tragédie Lyrique” in 3 acts.  Text also by Rousseau.  Text published Lyons, 1741. Acc. to Arthur Pougin (Jean-Jacque Rousseau, p. 140), Rousseau only ever completed music for the first act. 

Blaise

1751

Adolphe Blaise (after Rameau), Les Amours champestres, pastorale, parodie de l'acte des sauvages, quatriŹme entrée des Indes galantes [libretto by L. Fuzelier, music by J. P. Rameau], avec les airs notŹs. – a burlesque on Les sauvage.

Graun

1755

Carl Heinrich Graun (1704-57), Montezuma, a tragedia per music in three acts First performed: Berlin, 1755

Howard

1762

Henry Howard (d. 1766), A New Humorous Song on the Cherokee Chiefs. Broadside. Published London, [1762].

Boyce

1765

Samuel Boyce (d. 1775), A New Song on the Arrival of the Cherokee King & His Chiefs.  For voice and continuo (figured bass).  Words by the composer.  Published London, 1765.  First line: “From regions wild and drear we come, Britannia’s isle to see.” 

Majo

1765

Gian Francesco de Majo (1732-70), Motezuma. Opera in three acts.  First of many settings of a libretto by V. A.  Cigna-Santi. (See also 1771, 1772, 1780, and 1781.)  Performed Torino, Teatro Regio.  (Also produced as La Conquista del Messico)

Grétry

1768

Andre E. M. Grétry (1741-1799), Le Huron.  Comédie en deux actes at en vers by J. F. Marmontel.  In two acts based on “L’ingénu,” a story by Voltaire.  Performed Paris, 1768.  Published at the 14th Liraison in Oeuvres de Grétry Published Leipzig and Bruxelles: Breitkopf and Härtel, n.d. 

Grétry

1770

André-Ernest-Modeste Grétry, L’Amitie ą l’Épreuve.  Opera in two acts.  Libretto by C. Favart and C. Fusée.  Performed Fontainebleau, 1770 and at Paris, Comédie Italien, 1771.  Enlarged to three acts for Fontainebleau, 1786.

Mysliveczek

1771

Josef Mysliveczek (1737-81), Motezuma. Opera in three acts.  A resetting of Cigna-Santi’s libretto for Majo.  Performed Florence, Teatro della Pergola.

Galuppi

1772

Baldassare Galuppi (1706-85), Motezuma. Opera in three acts.  A resetting of Cigna-Santi’s libretto for Majo.  Performed Venice, Teatro San Benedetto.

Paisiello

1772

Giovanni Paisiello (1740-1816), Motezuma.  Performed Teatro delle Dame, Rome.

Piccini

1772

Nicola Piccini (1728-1800), L’Americano ingentilito.  Intermezzo in 2 acts.  Performed Rome, 1772.  [Acc. to Loewenberg’s Annals of Opera, contains Indian characters]

Bach

1776

Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732-95), Die Amerikanerin.  Monologue with text by H. W. von Gerstenberg.  First perf. Riga, 1776.  For soprano with orchestra.  Score edited G. A. Walter (Berlin, 1919).  [Unclear if subject is indigenous American.  Likely not.]

Anon.

1777

Anonymous, Polly.  Production at the Haymarket, London of John Gay’s 1729 ballad opera set in the West Indies.  [Act III included a “Dance of Indians.”]

Insanguine

1780

Giacomo Insanguine (1740-95), Motezuma. Opera in three acts.  A resetting of Cigna-Santi’s libretto for Majo.  Performed Torino, Teatro Regio.

Anon.

1780

Anonymous, The Death Song of the Cherokee Indians   “An original Air, brought from America by a Gentleman. . . conversant with the Indian Tribes.”  The Words adapted to the Air by a Lady [i.e. Anne Hunter Home]. [Copy in Morrocco and Gleason’s Music in America.] First line: “The Sun sets in night”. Also called “The Indian Chief” and “The Indian Warrior” in various printed and manuscript sources.

Naumann

1780

Johann Gottlieb Naumann (1741-1801), Cora och Alonzo. Libretto in Swedish (1779) by by G. J. Adlerbeth after Jean Franćois Marmontel, Les Incas.  German libretto by Naumann in 1780.  Published Leipzig: Dˇkischen Buch Handlung, 1780.  First performed Stockholm, 1782.

Winter

1780

Peter von Winter (1754-1825), Kora und Alonzo.  Melodrama in two acts.  Libretto in German by J. M. von Babo after Marmontel.  Performed Munich, 1780/1781, Regensburg, 1781, and Prag, 1788.

Linley

1781

Thomas Linley (1733-95), Robinson Crusoe.  Harlequin pantomime.  Performed London, Drury Lane. Published London: S. A. and P. Thompson, 1781. [Includes No. 9: “Savages Landing” and No. 10: “Dance of Savages.”]

Zingarelli

1781

Nicola Antonio Zingarelli (1752-1837), Motezuma.  Opera in three acts.  A resetting of Cigna-Santi’s libretto for Majo.  Performed Naples, Teatro San Carlo.

Arne

1782

Michael Arne (1740-1786), The Overture, Songs, Duetts, Catch, Choruses & Comic-Tunes, with the Marches, and Dances in the Procession of the New Pantomime called The Choice of Harlequin or the Indian Chief, “adapted for the Harpsichord, and a Violin Accompanyment added to the Overture and some of the Tunes.” London. Longman & Broderip. [1782].  Performed: Covent Garden.

Kürtzinger

1782

P. I. Kürzinger, music to Inkle und Jariko.  Melodrama by Wilhelm Rothammer.  Performed Regensburg, Prince’s Theater, 1782.

Giordani

1783

Giuseppe Giordani (1744-98), Pizzaro nelle Indie, ossia La Distruzione del PerĚ.  Opera in two acts.  Performed Livorno, Teatro Avvalorati.

Pelissier

1783

Victor Pelissier (ca. 1845-1820) Columbus, or The Discovery of America, with Harlequin’s Revels.  Pantomime.  Performed Baltimore, New Theatre, 1783. 

Candeille

1785

Pierre Joseph Candeille (1744-1827), Pizarre, ou Le conquźte du Pérou.  Tragédie lyrique in a prologue and five acts based on Marmontel’s The Incas of Peru.  Libretto by Duplessis.  Performed Paris, Opéra.  Ms. BN.

Dalayrac

1786

Nicolas Dalayrac (1753-1809), Azémia, ou les Sauvages.  Comédie in three acts.  Libretto by Auguste E.X.P. de la ChaveussiŹre. "Représentée ą Fontainebleau, devant leurs Majestés, le 17 octobre 1786.”  Published Paris: Le Duc, 1786.  When performed at the Comédie-Italiens in Paris in 1787, it was supplied with an ammended title: Azémia, ou Le nouveau Robinson. Published Paris: Huguet, 1787. Rpnts. 1789, 1804; Overture arr. for piano and violin, 1820  [Set on an unidentified island, but probably is West Indies.]

Hook

1786

James Hook (1756-1827), Overture and “New Music” for The Peruvian.  Burletta in three acts.  Libretto by “a lady.”  For a play called The Peruvian, an adaptation of Favart and de Voisenon’s “L’Amitié a l’Épreuve, the libretto for Grétry’’s 1770 opéra-comique.  Performed London, Covent Garden, 1787.  [Score published as The Fair Peruvian, 1786.]

Arnold

1787

Samuel Arnold (1740-1802), Inkle and Yarico.  Opera in 3 acts, performed London, Haymarket Theatre, 1787. Story is derived from Steele – The Spectator, no. 11 (1711) – which is itself retold from Ligon’s True Exact History of the Island of Barbados. [Acc. to Loewenberg’s Annals of Opera, contains Indian characters]

Bianchi

1787

Francesco Bianchi (1752-1810), Pizzarro [sic].  Opera in three acts.  Librettist unknown.  Performed Venice, Teatro San Samuele.  Ms.

Dibdin

1788

Charles Dibdin (1745-1814), Arm'd with Jav'lin. The Celebrated Indian Battle. Written, composed & sung by Mr Dibdin at the Lyceum Theatre in The Whim of the Moment.

Cambini

1789

Giuseppe Cambini (1746-1825), Cora, ou La Prźtresse du soleil.  Opera comique in three acts.  Performed Paris, ThéČtre Beaujolais, 1787.

Dibdin

1789

Charles Dibdin, “Dear Yanko Say.” The Indian Song, written and composed by Mr. Dibdin. In The Oddities, or Man and No Wife, a “table entertainment” performed by Dibdin at the Lyceum Theatre, London.

Dutillieu

1789

Pierre Dutillieu (1754-97), Pizzarro, o La conquista del PerĚ.  Ballet with scenario by Sebastien Gallet.  Based on Marmontel’s The Incas of Peru.  Performed Naples.

Teyber

1789

Franz Teyber, music for Fernando und Jariko, oder Die Indianer [Die Wilden und Gesitteten].  Singspiel after Chamfort with libretto by K. Eckartshausen.  Performed Vienna, Freihau Theater, 1789.

Zumsteeg

1789

Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg (1760-1802), Grablied, text after Kotzebue, Die Sonnenjungfrau, act 4, scene 1.

Arnold

1790

Samuel Arnold.  New Spain, or Love in Mexico.  Burletta in three acts.  Libretto by J. Scawen.  Performed London, Haymarket. [Includes two principal American Indian characters, the chief Zempoalla and the noble Cherokee Alknomook. No. 17 in the opera is Alknomook’s famous “Death Song of the Cherokee Indians.”]

Dibdin

1790

Charles Didbin, The Indian Death Song.  As sung in The Wags, a “table entertainment” performed by Dibdin at the Lyceum Theatre, London.  London: Printed & sold by the author, at his music warehouse 411 Strand, opposite the Adelphi, 1790. 

Seyfried

1790

Ignaz von Seyfried (1776-1841), Kora, Die Sonnenjungfrau.  Musical play in five acts.  Text by A. Kotzebue.  Music by Seyfried and M. Stegmayer.  Performed Vienna, Fasanth Theater, 1790, and at the Burgtheater, 1791.

Bernardini

1791

Marcello Bernardini (aka “Marcello di Capua,” 1740-ca. 1799), Pizarro nelle Indie.  Opera in two acts.  Performed Naples, Teatro San Carlo.

Cimarosa

1791

Domenico Cimarosa (1749-1801), La vergine del sole. Opera based on Marmontel’s The Incas of Peru.  St. Petersburg, 1791.

Gram

1791

Hans Gram (1754-1804), The Death Song of an Indian Chief.  For voice and keyboard accompaniment.  The title page reads: “Taken from Ouabi, an Indian Tale, in Four Cantos by Philenia, a Lady of Boston” [= Sarah Wentworth Morton].  First appeared in the March, 1791 issue of the Massachusetts Magazine.  Later published Boston: Thomas and Andrews, 1793. [In Morrocco and Gleason’s Music in America.]

Méhul

1791

Étienne Nicolas Méhul (1763-1817).  Cora.  Opera in four acts based on Marmontel’s The Incas of Peru.  Libretto by Valladier.  Performed Paris Opera, 1791.

Anon.

1792

Anonymous, Music to Columbus, or The Discovery of America.  Melodrama by Thomas Morton.  Performed London, Covent Garden, December, 1792.

Hewitt

1794

James Hewitt (1770-1827), Tammany (America Discovered); or The Indian Chief.  Ballad opera in 3 acts, also called a “serious opera.”  Libretto by Anne Julia Hatton.  First performed in New York by the Old American Company on 3 March 1794 and ran through April.  Both score and libretto are lost, although the text of the songs were published (New York: Harrison, 1794).  [The cast included Columbus and other Spanish characters as well as Indian characters, including an Indian chorus.  The play featured the song Alknomook: The Death Song of the Cherokee Indians, thought to be by an anonymous composer.  (See 1780, Anon.).  The playbill (reprinted in Vernon Grenville, Yandee Doodle-Doo) notes the inclusion of a “Indian Dance” performed by Misters [John] Durang and Miller, both actors.]

Anon.

1794

Anonymous, “Yarrimore.  An Indian Ballad.” Published Philadelphia: Carr & Cos. Musical Repository, n.d.  Song for voice and piano.  Also for “guitar.”  First Line of Chorus: You shall see never again your "Yarrimore" [text varies with each verse]

Pelissier

1794

Victor Pelissier, music to Inkle and Yarico.  Performed Boston, 1794.

Storace

1794

Stephen Storace (1762-1796), The Cherokee. Opera in 3 acts.  Words by James Cobb.  Text reproduced in F. Longe Collection of plays, v. 233.  The music “principally by Stephen Storace.”   Performed London, Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, 20 Dec 1794. Vocal score published, 83 pp, London: J. Dale, 1795. Reproduction: Photocopy.  San Rafael, Calif.: American Music Research Center, [1970s].  Score reprinted in 1977 by Belwin Mills,  Kalmus vocal series; 9069

Dittersdorf

1795

Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf (1739-1799), “The Fields their Wonted Hues Resume.”  Air sung by Mrs. Bland in the opera of The Cherokee, the words by Peter Pindar.  London: Printed for G. Goulding, 1795.

Giordani

1795

Tommaso Giordani (ca. 1733-1806), “The Dart Of Izdabel Prevails: The Celebrated Death Song of the Cherokee Indian.”  Text by Dr. Warton. First line: “The dart of Izdabel prevails”  Performed London, 1856)

Gerl

1796

Thaddäus Gerl (1766-1844), music to Die Spanier in Peru.  Singspiel in German by the composer after Kotzebue.  Performed Brno, 1795.  A  “Trauergesang” was published separately.  Performed in (The Spanish in Peru, or) Rolla’s Death.  Brünn, Austria.  28 Feb. 1796.

Anon.

1796

Anonymous, “The Indian Princess.”  In Thompson's Twenty-four Country Dances for the Year 1796, p. 89.  Published: London.  Also found in the American Ladies Pocketbook, 1797, p. 145-46.

Weigl

1796

Joseph Weigl (1766-1846), Alonso and Cora.  Ballet-pantomime after Marmontel.  Scenario by L. Traffieri.  Performed Vienna, Kärntnertor Theater, 1796.

Winter

1796

Peter Winter, Das unterbrochene Opferfest: Eine heroisch-komische Opera in two acts.  Libretto by Franz Xaver Huber.  Performed Vienna, Kärtnertor Theater, 1796. After Marmontel’s Les Incas (1777).  Takes place in Cuzco, shortly after 1532.

Hewitt

1797

James Hewitt, “The Wampum Belt.”  Song for voice and keyboard.  New York: Printed from James Hewitt and Frederich Rausch, [1797].  Reprinted in John W Wagner, ed. James Hewitt: Selected Compositions in Recent Researches in American Music, vol. XII (1980), p. 43.

Jadin

1797

Louis Emmanuel Jadin (1768-1853), Candos, ou Les Sauvages du Canada.  Opéra-comique in three acts.  Libretto by E. Delrieu.  Performed Paris, ThéČtre Feydeau, 1797.

Mazzinghi

1797

Joseph Mazzinghi (1765-1844), Pizarro.  Ballett with scenario by Sebastien Gallet (see also Dutillieu, 1789 and Rolla, 1807).  Performed London.

Anon.

1797

Anonymous, music to Indian War Feast: The American Heroine  (pantomime).  Libretto by Burk.  First performed Boston, 10 May 1797. 

Reinagle

1797

Alexander Reinagle (1756-1809), “Indian March” from Columbus, or The Discovery of America.  Play in five acts by Thomas Morton. First performed London, Covent Garden, 1792.  No music for the London production is known to survive.  Music for three different American productions is cited by Reinagle (Philadelphia), James Hewitt (New York), and Peter A. van Hagen (Boston).  Published as a broadside by Philadelphia: C. Hupfeld, 1799.

Kauer

1798

Ferdinand Kauer (1751-1831), Inkle and Yariko.  Opera in 1 act, based on S. Arnold’s 1787 British opera (see 1787 – Arnold above).  Performed New York, 1798.

Portugal

1798

Marcos António Portugal (1762-1830), Fernando nel Messico.  Opera in three acts.  Libretto by F. Tarducci.  Performed Venice, Teatro San Benedetto.

Berton

1799

Henri Montan Berton (1767-1844), Cora et Alonzo.  Opera in three acts. 

Kelly

1799

Michael Kelly (1762-1826), “The Music of Pizarro” as performed at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane, 1799.  Published Dublin: Hime, 1799. This includes a number of pieces by composers other than Kelly (including Gluck). “Grand March in the Temple of the Sun” is by Kelly. 

Anon.

1799

“Indian Dance.”  For clarinet.  Manuscript of John Williams, pp. 39-40. 

Sanderson

1799

James Sanderson (1769-1841), Cora.  Burletta.  Text by Richard Cross.  Performed London, Surrey Theatre, 1799.  Overture and one song were published.

Weigl

1799

Joseph Weigl, Rollas Death, or The Spaniards in Peru.  Ballet-pantomime after Marmontel.  Scenario by L. Traffieri.  Performed Vienna, Kärntnertor Theater, 1799.

Kelly

1800

Michael Kelly, The Indian.  London, 1800.

Pelissier

1800

Victor Pelissier, The Virgin of the Sun. Also titled Alzuma, or The Death of Pizarro. Drama with music after Kotzebue. Text by Arthur Murphy.  Performed New York, 1800.

Sanderson

1800

James Sanderson, “Talacoy. An Indian Ballad” as sung by Mrs. Herbert in The Algerine Corsair…at the Royal Circus. Written by Mr. Cross for The Algerine [sic] Corsair.  London: E. Riley, ca. 1800.

Lasser

1801

Johann Baptist Lasser (1751-1805), Cora und Alonzo.  Opera after Marmontel.  Performed Munich, Hoftheater, 1801.

Zumsteeg

1801

Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg (1760-1802), “Nadowessische Todtenklage” (“Sioux Death Song”).  Lied for voice and keyboard.  From Schiller’s poem of the same name, inspired by the text of a “Death Song” in John Long’s Voyages and Travels… (1791).  Music in Zumsteeg, Lieder und Balladen, vol. 3.

Darondeau

1802

Henri Darondeau (1779-1865) and Gerardin-Lacour, music to Pixérécourt’s “melodrame historique” of Kotzebue’s Pizarro entitled Pizarre, ou, La conquźte du Pérou.  Produced at the ThéČtre de la Porte St.-Martin, Paris.

Moorehead

1802

John Moorehead (1760-1804), “The Favorite Indian Ballad in La Perouse.” The poetry by George Colman. Music composed and arranged for the harp or pianoforte. First Line: “My name be Umba.”

Thollé

1802

Thomas Thollé (1757-1823), Atala.  Opera in two acts.  Performed Paris, ThéČtre Jeunes Artistes, 1802.

Thorley

1802

Thomas Thorley, “Poor Eliza, or the Indian Captive.”  Song. Arranged for the piano forte with an accompaniment for a violin, harp or flute. The words & music by Mr. Thorley.

Mayr

1803

Johann Simon Mayr (1763-1845), Alonso e Cora.  Opera buffa in two acts.  Libretto by G. Bernardoni.  Performed Milan, Theatro alla Scala.  Also produced as Cora in Naples, Teatre San Carlo, 1815 and as Isalide, ossia La Vergine del sole, location unknown.

Seyfried

1804

Ignaz von Seyfried, Montezuma oder Tippo Saib.  Melodrama in 3 acts by Joseph von Seyfried.  Performed Vienna, Theater an der Wien, 1804.  Music is lost.

Blewitt

1805

Jonas Blewitt, “Alonso and Cora.”  Song.  Text by W. Hare.  Based on an episode from Marmontel.  London: Clementi and Co., 1805 ca.

Rolla

1807

Allessandro Rolla (1757-1841), Pizarro, o la conquista del Perú. Pizarro.  Ballett with scenario by Sebastien Gallet (see also Dutillieu, 1789 and Mazzinghi, 1797).  Performed Milan, La Scala.

Bray

1808

John Bray (1782-1822), The Indian Princess or La Belle sauvage.  An operatic melo-drame in 3 acts. Text by James Nelson Barker.   Performed Philadelpha, 1808.  Facsimile of the libretto and vocal score published in 1972 with a new introduction by H. Wiley Hitchcock.  [Based on the Pocahontas story.]

Spontini

1809

Gaspare Spontini (1774-1851), Fernando Cortez, ou La Conquźte du Mexique.  “Tragédie lyrique” in 3 acts.  Text by E. Jouy and J. Emenard.  First performance at the ThéČtre de l'Académie Impériale de Musique in November, 1809.  Published Paris: Erard, 1809 and in the same year in Vienna.  Reprint New York: Garland, 1980.

Wöber

1809

Wöber, music to Columbus. Play in four acts by Klingemann.  Produced Berlin, Königliche Theater, 1809.  Music is lost.

Venua

1810

Frédéric Marc Antoine Venua, Constance and Almanzor. A favorite grand Indian ballet. Arranged for the piano forte. Op: 8.  London: Printed by Goulding, Phipps, D’Almaine, & Co., 1810.

King

1811

Matthew Peter King (1773-1823), The Americans. London, 1811.

Bishop

1812

Henry Rowley Bishop (1786-1855), The Virgin of the Sun. Burletta in three acts.  Text by F. Reynolds after Kotzebue’s The Spaniards in Peru.  Performed London, Covent Garden, 1812. [Ms. at BL]

Darondeau

1815

Henry Darondeau, Music to Guilbert de Pixérécourt, Christophe Colomb, ou la Découverte du nouveau monde.  “Mélodrame historique” in 3 acts.  Performed Paris, ThéČtre de la Gaité, 1815.  Text published in ThéČtre Choisi, vol. 3, Paris, 1842.  [Ms. at Paris Opéra Library]

Horsley

1815

William Horsley (1774-1858), “When Shall We Three Meet Again.”  A ballad for solo voice and piano, with an accompaniment for the piano forte or harp, the poetry written by an American Indian, etc. Also published in an arrangement for SSB chorus and piano, London: Clementi and Co., 1830.

Schubert

1815

Franz Schubert (1797-1828).  “Cora an die Sonne,” D.236.  Lied with text by Gabriele von Baumberg. 

Yaniewicz

1815

Felix Yaniewicz (1762-1848), Indian War Hoop, a rondo for the pianoforte.  London, Liverpool. [ca. 1815]

Rimbault

1816

Stephen Francis Rimbault (1773--1837), A Sonata for the Piano Forte in which is introduced the Cherokee Indian Death Song, with an accompaniment for the flute. Op. 12.  London, 1816.

Lefolle

1817

“War Dance” in the play The Armourer’s Escape, or Three Years at Nootka Sound (a melodrama by James Nelson Barker performed at Philadelphia’s Chestnut Street Theatre).  Music for the play was compiled and arranged by a violinist and music director by the name of “Mr. Lefolle.”  Music is lost.

Wrede

1817

J. P. Wrede, The Celebrated “Indian Rondo” for the Piano Forte or Harp, with an accompaniment for flute or violin.  Bath (England), 1817.

Pacini

1818

Giovanni Pacini (1796-1867), Atala.  Opera in three acts.  Libretto by Antonio Peracchi.  Performed Padua, Teatro Nuovo, 1818.

Anon.

1820

Anonymous, The Indian Chief's March (“General Gate's March”).  New York: Firth and Hall, 1820.  A one-page broadside.

Harris

1821

Joseph Macdonald Harris, The Indian Hunters. Song for voice and piano. The poetry by J. Finlaison. London, 1821. First Line: "O maiden leave…"

Bishop

1823

Henry Rowley Bishop, “Yes! tis the Indian Drum!  The admired Round for four voices from Cortez, or The Conquest of Mexico. Burletta in three acts.  Text by J. R. Planché.  Performed London, Covent Garden.  Score published London: Goulding, D'Almaine & Co., 30 Soho Square, n.d. 

Cramer

1824

John Baptist Cramer (1771-1858), Fantasia for pianoforte in which is introduced the round Yes 'tis the Indian Drum' from the opera Cortez by Sir H. R. Bishop.

Hummel

1825

Johann Nepomuk Hummel, (1778-1837), Indian Rondo for the Piano Forte Paul et Virginie. Ballet music. Op. 41.  London: Royal Harmonic Institution, [1825?]. Rpnt. London: Leader & Cock, Addison & Hollier, [1852.]

Maddison

1825

George W. Maddison, The American Lake Song, with variations for the pianoforte.  London, 1825. Republished in 1827 as “The American Lake Song, known by the name of the Canadian Boat Song, a celebrated Indian air, arranged with variations, for the piano forte and an accompaniment for the flute (ad lib). “ London: G. Walker, [WM 1827], 12 pp.

Puzzi

1825

Giovanni Puzzi, “When Your Beauty Appears.”  Indian air, words by Thomas Parnell, arranged as a duet, for soprano and tenor.  London: Printed by J. Willis & Co. for the Author, 1825.

Bayly

1830

Thomas Haynes Bayly, “When First We Met.”  Ballad.  London: Goulding & D’Almaine, 1830.

Gladstanes

1830

J. C. Gladstanes, The Indian. A glee for three voices. First line: "They made her a grave.” London, 1830.

Hummel

1830

Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Grand Characteristic Fantasia Founded Upon an Indian Air. For the piano forte with orchestral accompaniments, etc. [Parts for P. F. and strings.]  London. J. B. Cramer, Addison & Beale. [1830]. Five parts: piano and strings. [Rpnt. ed., 1835.

Rodwell

1830

George Herbert Rodwell, “Love a Captive,” sung. . .in Mr Peakes' melodramatic Entertainment, called The Wigwam, or the Men of the Wilderness.”  Poetry by C. J. Davids. Published London: Goulding & D'Almaine, [1830?]

Machold

1830s

G. Machold, “The Indian Girl.  Ballad.”  Words by Lois B. Adams. Published New York: James L. Hewitt, n.d.  First line: “She sits beside the lonely rill, With flowers her raven locks to twine.” 

Heinrich

1831

Anthony Philip Heinrich (1781-1861). Pushmataha: A Venerable Chief of a Western Tribe of Indians (“fantasia instrumental for orchestra”; London, 1831; revised New York, 1855; unpubl.). 

Heinrich

1834

Anthony Philip Heinrich, Logan, the Mingo Chief.  Grand Fantasia (one-movement orchestral work of symphonic poem proportions; London, 1834; revised New York, 1851; unpubl.).

Hörger

1834

G. Hörger (b. 1804), Atala.  Opera in two acts.  Libretto by C. G. Müller.  Performed Würzburg, Stadttheater, 1834.

Horn

1835

Charles E. Horn (1786-1849), “The American Indian Girl.”  Ballad.  Words by J. M. Smith Jr.  Published New York: Dubois and Bacon, 1835. Preface to song: “An American Indian Girl residing in one of the early settlements, upon being asked in the course of her education whether she did not think her present situation and prospects more happy than in wandering in ignorance among the woods, replied in the following strain of feeling and pathos: ‘O give me back my forest shade,’ etc.”

Panseron

1835

Auguste Panseron (1795-1859), Chant national des Osage.  Dedicated to “the Grand Kaniké. “ Text in Osage.  For piano solo.

Dielman

1836

Dielman, Henry.  “Grand March to the National Drama Pocahontas” Performed Philadephia, J. G. Osbourne’s Music Saloon, 1836. 

Adam

1837

Adolphe Adam (1803-56). Les Mohicans. Ballet in 2 acts; Paris, 1837.  Never published.  Considered to have been a flop.  [Ms. at BN]

Heinrich

1837

Heinrich, Anthony Philip.  Pocahontas--The Royal Maid and Heroine of Virginia, the Pride of the Wilderness: Fantasia Romanza (large orchestra; unpubl.); a set of free variations.

Russell

1837

Henry Russell (1812-1900), “The Indian Hunter.”  Song. Poetry by the young English poet Eliza Cook. [Also editions of 1842, 1856, and 1866.] First line: "Oh! why does the white man…" Arranged in 1865 for piano solo by J. B. Duvernoy.

Anon.

1839

Anonymous, “Indian War Whoop” in George P. Knauff’s Virginia Reels. Baltimore: F. D. Benteen, 1839.

Cowell

1840

Augusta Cowell, The Indian Exile. Song. First line: "An exile in the Indian land.”

Loder

1840

Edward James Loder (1813-65), Oh! say will you dwell in my Cedar Shade, or Song of the Indian Girl.  Voice and piano.  The poetry by Miss Byron.

Moore

1840

Thomas Moore (1779-1852), The Young Indian Maid.  Song for voice and piano.  Words and music by Thomas Moore. Published Philadelphia: A. Fiot, 1840.

Anon.

1840

Anonymous,  “The Metamora Grand March.”  Dedicated to Edwin Forrest.  “Composed for the piano by a professor.” Performed New York: Firth and Hall, 1840

Russell

1840

Henry Russell, Oh! Say Will You Dwell In My Cedar Shade, or Song of the Indian Girl.  The poetry by Miss Byron Loder.  London: T. Prowse, 1840.

Heinrich

1840

Anthony Philip Heinrich, Indian Fanfares.  Suite for piano.  Published Remshalden [W. Germany]: Clavis, 1987.  Forward by Widmar Hader.


CONTENTS: 1. The Comanche revel = Das Kamanschenfest – 2. The Sioux gaillarde = Die Sioux-Gaillarde – 3. The Manitou air dance = Manitous Tanz durch die Lüfte.

Baker

1841

John C. Baker, The Indian Girl (Song).  Sund by the Bakers of New Hampshire. Published Boston: C. H. Keith, 1841.

Russell

1841

Henry Russell, The Chieftain's Daughter. A Ballad.  The Poetry by George P. Morris.  New York: Firth & Hall, No. 1 Franklin Square, 1841.  First Line: “Upon the barren sand, a single captive stood.”  The subject is Pocahontas.  Dedicated to General Winfield Scott by George Morris.

Russell

1841

Henry Russell, The Soldier and His Bride.  Song with text by George P. Morris.  New York: Firth & Hall, 1841.  The subject is the captivity and murder of Jane McCrea in 1777.

Anon.

1843

Anonymous, Roll swiftly to the spirit's land (“The Indian woman's death song”), a ballad; “the words by Mrs. Hemans”  [see 1854, Felicia Dorothea Hemans, below], “the music composed by a young friend.”  Published London, 1843.

Knight

1843

Knight, A. F. “Song of the Red Man,” No. 2 of 7 “composed and dedicated to his friend Anselm Lothrop, Esq. by A.F. Knight.” Published Boston: Henry Prentiss, 1843.  [Same as “Nolcini” below.]

Nolcini

1843

Nolcini (arranged), The Indians. For piano.  Published Boston: Henry Prentiss, 1843. The titles of each of the seven pieces (published separately) are listed on the cover: 

CONTENTS: 1. King Philip’s Quick Step -- 2. Song of the Red Man -- 3. On Ka Hye Waltz -- 4. Osceola Quick Step -- 5. Kewkuck Quick Step -- 6. Black Hawk Quick Step – 7. Nohmookee Waltz.

Brown

1844

Francis H. Brown (1818-1891), The Indian and His Bride.  Song for medium voice and piano.  Words by George P. Morris.  Dedicated to Hardy de Wees, M.D.  New York: Firth, Hall, and Pond, 1844. First line of text: “In the days that are gone.” Title page illustration: man and woman sitting on bank by stream.

David

1844

Félicien David (1810-1876).  “Danse de sauvages (Air de ballet),” “ChŌur de sauvages,” and “Lullaby of an Indian Mother” (La mŹre indienne, Berceuse) from Part IV, “The New World” of Christophe Colomb, ou La Découverte du nouveau monde , ode-symphonie for soloists, chorus, and orchestra; Published Germany, ca. 1850).

Dodworth

1844

Allen Dodworth (after Henry Russell), Indian Hunter Quick Step.  Arranged from Henry Russell's Popular Song of The Indian Hunter.  Dedicated to Henry John Sharpe.  New York: William Hall & Son, 239 Broadway, 1844.

Romani

1844

F. Romani, The Indian Bride's Farewell. Ballad.  Poetry by Edward J. Porter.  Baltimore: F.D. Benteen, 137 Baltimore St., 1844.

Saroni

1844

Herrman S. Saroni, The Pequot Brave.   New York: W. H. Geib, 1844.

Sullivan

1844

Mrs. Marion Dix Sullivan, The Blue Juniata.  Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1844.  Voice and piano.  Arranged by Edward Little White. First line of verse: “Wild rov'd an Indian girl, Bright Alfarata, where sweep the waters of the blue Juniata.”

Baker

1845

John C. Baker, The Burial of an Indian Girl.  Song for medium voice and piano.  Poetry by Lydia Howard Sigourney (1791-1865).  Boston: Keith’s Publishing House, 1845.  First line: “A wail upon the prairies.” Sung by Sophia M. Baker.  In the series Songs & Glees of the Baker Family of New Hampshire.

Commuck

1845

Thomas Commuck, Indian Melodies by T. Commuck. Harmonized by T. Hastings. New York: G. Lane & C. B. Tippett, 1845.

Guylott

1845

Robert Guylott, The Lay of the Indian Girl. A Romance First Line: "They tell me". Words by G. R. B. London, 1845.

Heinrich

1845

Anthony Philip Heinrich, The Indian Carnival: or, the Indian’s Festival of Dreams (one-movement symphony; completed ca. 1845; unpubl.).  Depicts an end-of-winter Bacchanale.

Heinrich

1845

Anthony Philip Heinrich, Manitou Mysteries or the Voice of the Great Spirit.  Gran Sinfonia Misteriosa Indiana (four-movement symphony for orchestra; completed ca. 1845;  Published in The Symphony in Croatia: Three Symphonies (Garland, 1984). Contains no program and no programmatic subtitles.

Heinrich

1845

Anthony Philip Heinrich, The Mastodon (symphony in three movements for large orchestra; entitled “musical portraitures”; unpubl.). 

CONTENTS: 1. Black Thunder, the Patriarch of the Fox Tribe – 2. The Elkhorn Pyramid or the Indian’s Offering to the Spirit of the Prairies – 3. Shenandoah, an Oneida Chief.

[The first and the third movements are musical portraits of actual figures, the second is a depiction of Indian customs and religions.  The subject matter for the second movement is derived from Prince Maximilian de Wied’s Travels in the Interior North America (1843), which Heinrich cites on the title page of the movement, and describes a Blackfoot ceremony performed before a hunt.  Notes from W. Maust.]

Mellon

1845

Alfred Mellon (1820-67), melodramatic music to The Green Bushes, a play by John Buckstone, Performed Adelphi Theatre, London. Music unpublished. Act II is set in America and features Miami, an Indian huntress. [copy at BL in Drury Lane manuscript collection]

Owen

1845

D. Owen, The Grey's Polka, introducing the celebrated Indian melody, as performed by the band of the Scots.  For piano solo.   [Also 1847]

Philips

1845

Henry Philips, The Huron’s Prayer.  New York, 1845.

Wesley

1845

Samuel Wesley (1766-1837), “Tobacco is an Indian Weed.” A 3 Part Song.  In Twelve Short Pieces for the Organ.  London, 1845.

Baker

1846

Benjamin Franklin Baker (1811-89), The Death of Osceola, glee for four voices (STTB).  Words by S. S. Steele.  Published Boston: Henry Tolman, 1846 (5 pp.)  Osceola was a Seminole chief (1804-1838).

Dempster

1846

William R. Dempster. Song of the Indian Hunter. Words by Eliza Cook.  Published Boston: Oliver Ditson, 115 Washington St., 1846.  First Line: “Oh! why does the white man follow my path like the hound on the tigers track?”  [This song uses the same words as Henry Russell’s famous song—of the same year—but is not the same tune.]

Heinrich

1846

Anthony Philip Heinrich, Indian War Council.  Gran Concerto Bellico.  A Grand Heroic Divertissement for 41 Instrumental Parts” (unpubl.).  A musical portrait of Tecumseh.  First performed Boston, 1846 with an accompanying descriptive program.  This was originally two works combined into one: Tecumseh, or The Battle of the Thames (a Martial Overture) and The Indian War Council.

Hutchinson

1846

John Wallace Hutchinson (1821-1908), The Indian’s Lament.  Words and melody by Hutchinson. Published Boston: Stephen W. Marsh, 1846.  Performed by the Hutchinson Family.  Illustration: American Indian standing on a rock / Lithograph of E.W. Bouvé. First line: “Alas, alas said the Indian, I once had a home.”  Published later Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1853.

Masters

1846

William J. Chalmers Masters, Introduction and Variations for the Piano Forte on H. Russell's Melody “The Indian Hunter.”  London, 1846.

Redler

1846

G. Redler, Les Sauvages, quadrille pour le Piano Forte, Solo and Duet.  Performed London, 1846

Rodwell

1846

George Herbert Rodwell, “My love's like the deer.” [Song.] The poetry by C. J. Davids.  Song from The Wigwam.  In The Musical Bijou, mdcccxlvi. p. 48, Performed London, 1846.

Russell

1846

Henry Russell, The Indian’s Lament. Song with text by Eliza Cook.  “Composed and dedicated to Henry John Sharpe, Esq. As a mark of esteem by his friend Henry Russell.”  Published New York: James L. Hewitt, 1846.  First Line: “Alas, alas, said the Indian; I once had a home…”

Woodbury

1846

Isaac Baker Woodbury (1819-1858), The Indian’s Prayer.  Published Boston: E. Wade, No. 197 Washington St., 1846.  First Line: “Let me go to my home in the far distant west, to the scenes of my childhood in innocence blest.” [Sung from the point of view of the “Indian.”  Wants to be buried in “my home.”]

Anon.

1846 (ca.)

Anon., Indian Chief’s March. “Composed and arranged for the pianoforte.” Published Boston: Oliver Ditson, n.d.  This is the same tune as the original Death Song of the Cherokee Indian.

Berg

1847

Albert W. Berg, La belle indienne.  For piano (7 pp.).  Dedicated to Susan Ridley Segwick.  Published New York: Firth, Hall, and Pond, 1847. Cover lithograph: scene of a young Indian woman standing on the shore of a wooded lake.

Heinrich

1847

Anthony Philip Heinrich, The Treaty of William Penn with the Indians. A “concerto grosso” in six sections; composed in London; unpubl.; revised in New York, 1847. This work is in six programmatically titled parts.  

CONTENTS: 1. The Meeting of William Penn and his Associates with the Delaware Indians – 2. The Treaty – 3. Smoking of the Calumet – 4. The Presentation of the Gifts to the Indians – 5.  The Grand Dance of the Calumet – 6. Coda Volante. The Manitou Air Dance.

Jacob

1847

Jacob of the Orphean Family, The Indian Girl’s Lament on the Banks of the Kennebec.  Sung by the Orphean Family. Words by C. Chauncey Burr.  Published New York: Holt, 1847.

Lee

1847

George Alexander Lee, “The Wild Free Wind,” Cora, the Indian Maiden's Song.  Poetry by Shirley Brooks.  From “the new burletta” called The Wigwam.  Published London: Leoni Lee & Coxhead, 1847. Reprinted in 1851 in New York (see below).

Lover

1847

Samuel Lover, The Indian Summer. Written & composed by Samuel Lover Songs of America. No. 1.  London: Duff & Hodgson, 1847.

Schröder

1847

Karl Schröder (1823-89), Pizzaro, oder Die Eroberung von Peru.  Opera.  Berlin.

Dempster

1848

William R. Dempster, The Dark Eye has Left Us. Song of Indian Women, from a Poem Entitled The Bridal of Pennacook.  Poem by John G. Whittier.  Published Boston: Oliver Ditson, 115 Washington St., 1848.  First Line of Chorus: Mat wonck kunna monee! Mat wonck kunna monee! Mat wonck kunna monee! We hear it no more.  Dedicatee: “Music Composed & Dedicated to His Friends and Lovers of Song on the Beautiful Banks of the Merrimac River.”

Howard

1848

Frank Howard and James T. Field, The Children in Exile.  Song for voice and piano.

Howard

1848

Frank Howard and W. B. Farwell.  The Indian’s Dream.  Song dedicated to Dr. J. F. Flagg.  Published Boston: S. W. Marsh, 1848.  First line of verse: “I dream…” (…years that passed away, a winding forest stream, and a house in the far-off west, etc.).

Heinrich

1849

Anthony Philip Heinrich, “The Cherokee’s Lament,” No. 4 in Presentazioni Musicali: Four Fantasies for the Voice and Pianoforte, “The Moan of the Forest, or the Chrokee’s Lament (Toccata Indiana). Published privately, New York, 1849.

Lover

1849

Samuel Lover, Give Me Arrows, and Give Me My Bow.” An Indian superstition of the Manitou Isles.” Song for voice and piano.  Written and composed by S. Lover.

Holmes

1850

William Henry Holmes, Fantasia for the Pianoforte on Indian airs.  Published London: D'Almaine & Co, 1850.  7pp.  

Hosmer

1850

E. A. Hosmer, The Indian Girl’s Song.  Words by J. M. Fletcher.  Published Boston: G. P. Reed, 1850.

Martin

1850

George Martin, The Grave of Uncas.  See Martin, 1857.  According to Finson, inspired by the appearance of Cooper’s Mohicans in a revised edition (1850).

Pike

1850

Marshall S. Pike, The Indian Warrior’s Grave.  Song for voice and piano (also available for vocal quartet).  Words by the composer.  Arranged by J. P. Ordway.  Five-p. score published Boston: A. and J.P. Ordway and New York: Waters and Berry, 1850. Dedicated: To the Hon. Moses H. Perley of St. John City, N.B.  First line: “Green is the grave by the wild dashing river.”  Cover: “Sung by the Harmoneons at their popular concerts.”

Sebastiani

1850

Giovanni Sebastiani (1818-99), Atala.  Opera with libretto by the composer.  Performed Rome, Teatro Argentina, 1850.

White

1850

Edward L. White (1809-1851), Sachem’s Daughter.  Song for medium voice and piano.  Poetry by J.E.A. Smith.  Published Boston: G.P. Reed, 1850. Title page illustration: Indian girl on shore. First line: “Bright as the foam on Casco's water.”

Anon.

1850s

Anonymous, The Indian Hunter, A Western Ballad, “adapted to a favorite melody,”  Published Baltimore: F.D. Benteen, successor to J. Cole, n.d.  First Line: “Let me go to my home in the far distant west, to the scenes of my youth that I still like the best.”  First Line of Chorus: “White man let me go!” [varies with each verse]

Anon.

1851

Anonymous [one “Mrs. L. L. D. J.”], “The Indian Student.”  Lament for voice and piano.  Dedicated to Mrs. Mary Gentry.  Published New Orleans: Wm. T. Mayo, 1851.

Butera

1851

Andrea Butera (1818-62), Atala.  Opera with libretto by Giuseppe Sapio [see also 1869].  Performed Palermo, Teatro Carolina, 1851.

Lee

1851

Alexander Lee, The Indian Maiden’s Song.  Words by Shirley Brooks, Esq. Published New York: Firth, Pond & Co. (1 Franklin Sq.), 1851.  First Line: “Oh! the wild free wind is a spirit kind, and it loves the Indian well.”

Hewitt

1852

John Hill Hewitt (“Professor of Music at the Young Ladies Collegiate Institute”), The Indian Polka. Published Baltimore: G. Willig, Jr., 1852.  Inscribed to his Pupil Miss Ann C. Jarboe.

Miguel

1852

J. E. Miguel, Indian March.  Orchestra piece, performed at a concert in Metropolitan Hall, New York.  7 June 1852.

Auber

1854

Daniel Auber (1782-1871), “Dans ces forźts sauvages, “Serenade from Marco Spada. London, 1854.

Anon.

1854

Anonymous. Thou'rt Passing from the Lake's Green Side.  “Indian song” for voice and piano.  Words by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

Magruder

1854

James E. Magruder, The Indian Captive, or, The Absent Lover.  Words by D. Loughery. Published Baltimore: J.E. Boswell, 1854. First Line: “White man take me back to my home in the West, where my innocent childhood was spent free from care.” 

Root

1854

George Frederick Root (1820-95), The Pilgrim Fathers. Cantata.  Words by Frances J. Crosby.  [The latter half of the cantata deals with an Indian-Pilgrim battle of 1621].

Clark

1855

James G. Clark, “The Indian Mother’s Lullaby.”  Lament for voice and piano.   Cleveland: S. Brainard & Sons, 1855.

Woolcott

1855

Francis Woolcott, “Wenona of the Wave.”  Song for voice and piano. Word by T. Ellwood Garrett . Published St. Louis, 1855. [Wenona was a Dacota Sioux chief who’s daughter threw herself over a precipice because she was forced to marry a man she did not love.]

Wood

1855

T. Wood, “They are Gone, They are Gone; or, The Red Man’s Requiem.”  “Lament for voice and piano.”  Song and quartet.  New York: H. Waters, 1855.

Converse

1856

Charles Crozat Converse (1832-1918), Death of Minnehaha. Published Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., 115 Washington St., n.d.  Oliver Ditson published (or was to have published) at least three other Converse songs on Hiawatha texts (all in 1856): The Death of Minnehaha, My Algonquin (from canto 12), and Onaway, Awake!

Eaton

1856

E. K. Eaton, Hiawatha Schottische. Published Portland: J.S. Paine, 1856.  Copy at the Longfellow National Historic Site, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Gilbert

1856

Ernest Thomas Bennett Gilbert, Hiawatha, romance poŹtique pour piano. Op. 12.  Published, London, 1856.

Hatton

1856

John Liptrot Hatton (1808-1886), Music to Charles Kean’s production of Pizarro, or The Spaniards in Peru.  Performed Princess Theatre, London, 1856. Note in the program: “The Indian airs are founded on melodies published in Rivero and Tschudi’s work on Peruvian Antiquities as handed down to us by Spaniards after the conquest.” [Music is lost]

Hill

1856

L. A. Hill, The Hiawatha Polka.  For piano solo.  Published London, 1856.

Pelzer

1856

Anne W. Pelzer, Hiawatha's Farewell First Line: "Farewell, farewell my Minnehaha." Words by Longfellow. Published London, 1856.

Peticolas

1856

C. L. Peticolas, Hiawatha Polka. Published Baltimore, Maryland: Miller and Beacham, 1856.

Shrivall

1856

Frederick R. Shrivall, The Indian Girl's Lament First Line: "An Indian girl was sitting".   London, 1856.

Shrivall

1856

Frederick R. Shrivall, The Indian Hunter's Serenade or "Thy bower awaits thee dearest". London, 1856.

Wallis

1856

Louis Wallis, Sioux March. Published St. Louis: Balmer & Weber, 1856.  Lithograph by E. Robyn of mounted U.S. troops attacking a Sioux camp.

Blockley

1857

John J. Blockley, The Song of Hiawatha, (“I am happy, I am happy”) written by H. W. Longfellow.

Blockley

1857

John J. Blockley, “Tobacco.” First Line: "Tobacco is an Indian weed".  London, 1857.

Cady

1857

Chauncy Marvin Cady, Minnehaha Glee Book, a collection of popular glees, part songs, duets, trios, quartets and choruses, etc.

Gregory

1857

W. Gregory, The Indian Polka.  For piano solo.  Uxbridge, 1857.

Lucas

1857

Charles Lucas, "Ah! Fading Joy."  Madrigal for 5 voices. The words from Dryden's Indian Emperor. Reprinted, 1883.

Martin

1857

George H. Martin, The Grave of Uncas, a ballad for medium voice and piano. Published Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1857. [“The music composed and dedicated to the remnants of the Mohecan Tribe of Indians by George H. Martin.”]

Thomas

1857

Julia P. Thomas, Metamora Quickstep.  Piano.  Published Boston: Henry Tolman, 1857.  ["To the officers & members of the Boston Light Infantry."]

Wood

1857

D. Wood, “On Away! On Away!” Words by H. W. Longfellow.  Published Philadelphia: Beck & Lawton, S.E. Cor. 7th & Chesnut St., 1857. Successors to J.E. Gould.

Gagnon

1858

Ernest Gagnon (1834-1915), Stadaconé: Danse sauvage pour piano.  Published Montreal: John Lovell, 1858.  Reprinted in The Canadian Musical Heritage, vol. 1, ed. Elaine Keillor (1983).  [“Stadaconé was the name of the Iroquois village on the site of present-day Quebec City.”]

Karst

1858

Karst, Emile (1826-1917) and Jacques Ernest Miquel.  Hiawatha: a cantata. Libretto Published St. Louis:  R. P. Studley, 1858. Words by Henry W. Longfellow; “vocal music by Emile Karst; orchestral music by J. E. Miguel.”

Lover

1858

Samuel Lover, The flower of night.  Song for voice and piano.  Written and composed by S. Lover. First Line: "There is an Indian tree they say".

Benkert

1859

George Felix Benkert (1831-?), Das Indianer Mädchen: Ein Bild aus Pennsylvaniens Vorzeit = The Indian Girl: A Scene in the Early History of Pennsylvania. For orchestra.  Manuscript, 1859.  43pp.  "Text von L.A. Wollenweber."  The name of John Philip Sousa stamped on title page.  Microfilm in the Sousa Collection, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. 

Flément

1859

Argénor Flément, Hiawatha, Valse Brillante, For piano solo.  Op. 30.  London, 1859.

Harvey

1859

Richard Frederick Harvey, Waltz, Minnehaha! (Laughing Water) for the piano forte.  London: John Shepherd, 1859.

Heinrich

1859

Anthony Philip Heinrich, Der Felsen von Plymouth, oder Die Landung der Pilger Väter in Neu-England A.D. 1620. For orchestra. Composed in Prague; unpubl.   This work is in seven programmatically titled parts. [The third, “Baletto indico nazionale: Freudentänze der Squaws nach erhaltenen Geschenken” is as close as Heinrich ever came, according to Maust, “to the employment of native Indian music.”]

Sherwin

1859

W. F. Sherwin, “Away, Away, With Hearts So Gay!”  Hiawatha Boat Song. Quartette for Male Voices.  Poetry by H. P. Ross. Published Albany: J.H. Hidley, 519 Broadway, 1859.

Sobolewski

1859

Edward Sobolewski (1808-72). Mohega, die Blume des Waldes (opera).  Performed Milwaukee, 1859.  Unpublished score is lost. 

Stoepel

1859

Robert August Stoepel (1821-1887). Hiawatha, “Indian Symphony” (4 soloists, chorus, and orchestra. Published New York: William Hall and Son, 1863. First Performed 1859, if not before.  Dedicated “to his friend L[ouis] M[oreau] Gottschalk.”  Work in two parts and 14 sections. No 8, “(Chibiabo’s) Love Song,” tenor and piano, was published separately in the same year.  First Libe: “Onaway! Awake, beloved!”  The composer’s autograph presentation copy to architect J. Wrey Mould is at the NYPL.

Wallerstein

1859

Ferdinand Wallerstein, Awake, Beloved, an Indian song. First Line: "Onaway, awake beloved". From The Song of Hiawatha by Longfellow.

Lumbye

1860

Hans Christian Lumbye (1810-1874). “Indian War Dance” from the vaudeville-ballet Fjernt fra Danmark (1860).   PPublished in Folkeudgave af H.C. Lumbye’s Kompositioner, Copenhagen: Wilhelm Hansen, 1880.

Richards

1860

Henry Brinley Richards (after Bishop), Hark! 'tis the Indian Drum. (Sir H. R. Bishop's trio,) arranged for the Pianoforte. Reprinted 1868.

Rubenstein

1860

Anton Rubenstein (1829-94), “Sauvage et indienne,” from Bal costumé: suite de morceaux caractéristiques pour piano ą quatre mains, op. 103.  Published Berlin: Bote & Bock, 1860

Capel

1861

Charles Capel, Minnehaha Valses.  For piano solo. London, 1861.

Howard, W

1861

William Howard of Edinburgh, Indian Galop.  For piano solo.  Published Edinburgh, 1861.  [Possibly east Indian in subject.]

Fumi

1862

Vinceslao Fumi (1826-80), Atala. Opera. Performed Buenos-Aires, Teatro Lirico, 1862.

Emery

1863

A. T. Emery and O. C. Jillson, “The Indian Lover.”  Song for voice and piano.

Halévy

1863

Jacques Fromenthal Halévy (1799-1862). Jacuarita l’indienne. Opera comique in three acts.  Libretto by Saint-Georges and Leuven. First performed, Theatre Lyrique, 14 May 1855.  Score published Paris: Jules Heinz, n.d. [Later served as the basis for William Vincent Wallace’s opera The Desert Flower, 1863]

Parkhurst

1863

[Mrs.] E. A. Parkhurst, Mary Fay. Song. First Line: "By Mohawk's stream the Indian roved" Words by J. R. Orton.

Riddell

1863

Robert Scott Riddell, The Indian Waltzes.  For piano solo. Reprinted 1880.

Wallace

1863

William Vincent Wallace (1812-65). The Desert Flower.  Romantic Opera in Three Acts written by Mess. Harris and Williams. Published New York: William Hall & Son, 1863. See esp. No. 19, “Indian March and Chorus,” vocal score pp. 168-73 and several other numbers.

Wood

1863

Frank Wood (1844-1919), Minnehaha, Song and Chorus.  For medium voice, chorus, and piano.  Words by Captain R. H. Chittenden.  Cover title: “To the Memory of the Victims of the Indian Massacre of 1862.” Refers to the Dakota Indian War of 1862-65. Published New York: William A. Pond, 1863, 7 pp.

Baumer

1865

Annette Baumer, The Indian Summer. Ballad. First Line: "They tell me of climes". London, 1865.

Cyr

1866

Léon Saint Cyr, Minnehaha (Laughing Water) for the Pianoforte.  London, 1866.

Jost

1866

J. W. Jost, John Ross.  Composed for the funeral of John Ross, Chief of the Cherokees.  Words by Francis DeHaes Janvier.  For high voice, SATB chorus, and piano. Published Philadelphia: C.W.A. Trumpler, 1866.  Portrait of John Ross on front cover.

Ortega

1867

Ancieto Ortega del Villar (1825-1875), Guatimozin. Opera on an Aztec legend. Mexico. PremiŹred, the Gran Teatro Nacional on 13 September 1871.

Distin

1868

Theodore Distin, the Elder, The Indian Hunter. Song. First Line: "When the summer harvest". Words by Longfellow.  London, 1868.

Winner

1868

Septimus Winner (1827-1902), Ten Little Injuns. Published Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1868. Reprinted in 1896. First Line of Chorus: “One little, two little, three little, four little, five little ‘Injun’ boys.”  Performed by E. F. Dixey (E. Freeman), 1833-1904. Reproduced Philadelphia: Harry Dichter, 1956; Musical Americana, no. 88.

Work

1868

Henry Clay Work. “The Song of the Red Man.”   Original publication unknown.  In Songs of Henry Clary Work, 1884.

Caspari

1869

Theo Caspari, The Indian Lament Polka. [sic!] For Piano solo. Published Philadelphia: G. André & Co., 1869. 

Glover

1869

Stephen Glover, The Indian Hunter’s Bride.  Ballad. First Line: "Away, away".  Words by J. E. Carpenter.  Published London: Willey & Co., 52 Gt. Marlborough St. W., n.d.

Hatton

1869

John Liptrot Hatton, The Indian Maid. A Four-part Song, words by Mrs. N. Crosland. Published London: Novello & Co.  Choral Songs. No. 5.  Novello's Part-Song Book. Second Series. Vol.i. No. 60.  [Edition also of 1886 and as late as 1907]

Meneses

1869

Miguel Meneses, Atala.  Opera on Giuseppe Sapio’s libretto (see 1851).  Performed Guadalajara, Mexico, 1869.

Sydenham

1870

Edwin Augustus Sydenham, Laughing Water (Minnehaha) morceau pour le Pianoforte.   London, 1870.

Johnson

1871

James C. Johnson, The Indian Summer. Cantata.  Edited in the Tonic Sol-Fa notation by J. Curwen.  Reprinted 1882, arr. by T. Crampton.

Wood

1871

Frank Wood, Old Betz, a song.  “Respectfully dedicated to Old Betz, a Sioux squaw 120 years of age, the oldest living Indian known."  Words by J. H. Hanson. Published St. Paul, MN: Munger Brothers and NY: William A. Pond, 1871.

Bristow

1872

George Frederick Bristow (1825-1898), Indian War Dance.  Mvt. 3 from The Pioneer (or “Arcadian”): Symphonie for grand orchestra, Op. 50.  Unpublished.  Composed 1872. First three movements intended as an orchestral prelude to a proposed cantata, never written on the same name: The Pioneer, Op. 49. Final ms. of symphony has Opus 50. First performance: Brooklyn 8 February 1873, Philharmonic Society.  [Baker incorrectly cited the 1st perf. date of 14 Feb. 1874.  This was corrected by Barton Cantrell at the NYPL.]

CONTENTS.--1. Allegro appassionato -- 2. Adagio (Motive: Tallis' Evening Hymn) -- 3. Allegro ma non troppo (Indian War Dance) -- 4.Finale. Allegro con spirito - Presto.

Wood

1872

Frank Wood, Laughing Water, or The Enchanted Dell of Minne-ha-ha, a song.  Words by J. H. Hanson. Published St. Paul, MN: Munger Brothers and NY: William A. Pond, 1871.

Poussard

1873

Horace Poussard, Danse de Sauvages Polka pour Piano.  Paris, 1873.

Tivolie

1873

N. P. Tivolie, Hee-Lah-Dee!  Song, with chorus.  Words by Miss Katie Belle Wichmann. Published New York: Lee and Walker, 1873.  Preface: “Among the superstitions of the Seneca Indians, was one remarkable for its singular beauty…”

Grobe

1874

Charles Grobe (after Bishop), “Hark! 'tis the Indian Drum,” Bishop's glee, arranged with variations for the Pianoforte.

Whitaker

1874

John Whitaker, The Indian Maid, Ballad. First Line: "Oh! this was the cot.”  London, 1874.

Clay

1875

Frédéric Clay (1838-1889), Indian excerpts from Princess Toto, an operetta to a libretto by W. S. Gilbert. 3 acts, Covent Garden, 1875. Published London: Metzler and Co., n.d.

Debillemont

1875

Jean-Jacques Debillemont, Round the World. Indian galop. For piano solo.  Published London, 1875.

Barker

1876

George Arthur Barker, The Scottish Blue Bells. First Line: "Let the proud Indian boast".

Barnett

1876

John Francis Barnett, The Indian Girl. Song.

Gallignani

1876

Giuseppe Gallignani (1851-1923), Atala.  Opera in three acts.  Libretto by Emilio Praga.  Performed Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1876.

Mascall

1876

Sarah Frances Mascall, The Indian Bride. Romance. First Line: "Why comes he not"

Saunders

1876

Deshayes Saunders, The Indian Nurse Girl's Song. Words by J. A. Crosby. First Line: "Rest thee gentle baby".

Schultz-B.

1876

Heinrich Schultz-Beuthen, Indian Corn Dance. Published Cincinnati: John Church, 1876. Written for (and performed by) the Theodore Thomas Orchestra.

Schweitzer

1876

Otto Schweizer, Minnehaha (Laughing Water).  Valse brillante, pour le Piano. Another, possibly reprinted edition, 1885.

Tussaud

1876

Frank Tussaud, The Indian Polka for the Pianoforte.  London, 1876.

Satter

1877

Gustav Satter.  No. 10, “War Dance of the Indians” from Douze Souvenirs pour piano. Op. 94. Published Leipzig: Fr. Kistner, 1877.  

Contents: No. 1. Mount Vernon (Elégie) No. 2. Newport (Barcarolle) No. 3. Bunker Hill (PrŹlude hŹroôque) No. 4. Saratoga (Valse noble) No. 5. Mount Tom <Vt.> (Marche matinale) No. 6. Farmington <Conn.> (Idylle) No. 7. Lagrange <Ga.> (FÍte de la Rťcolte) No. 8. Easton <Pa.> (Chant d'automne) No. 9 Louisville <Ky.> (Marche du 4 juillet) No. 10. Texas (Danse guerriŹre des Indiens) No. 11. Baltimore (Les premiŹres roses) No. 12. New York (Serenade sur le Hudson).

Genée

1878

Genée, Franz Richard.  Die letzten Mohicaner. Opera in 3 acts. Libretto by F. Zell after Cooper. Performed Vienna, 1878. 

Phelps

1878

Ellsworth C. Phelps (1827-1913). Hiawatha Symphony for Grand Orchestra, Op. 31.  First Performed under Theodore Thomas in New York on May 10, 1880 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. [Ms. at NYPL.]

Fuller

1879

Charles A. Fuller, “Manitoba Bells.” Song for voice and piano.  Words by Fordyce H. Benedict.  New York: Spear & Dehnhoff, 1879. [Copy at MN.] 

Pridham

1879

John Pridham, General Roberts's Indian March.  For piano solo.   London, 1979. [May be east Indian.]

Smallwood

1879

William Smallwood, The Indian March.  For piano solo.  London, 1879.  [May be east Indian.]

Bennett

1880

William Sterndale Bennett (1816-1875), Indian Love, Song, etc.  Six Songs. Op. 35. No. 1.  London: Novello, Ewer, & Co., 1880.

Molloy

1880

James Lynam Molloy, Dinah Doe, The Golden Haired Darkey.  Indian pastorale from My Aunt's Secret. The words by F. C. Burnand.

Phelps

1880

Ellsworth C. Phelps, The Last of the Mohicans (opera). Based on the novel by J. F. Cooper.  Unproduced; score not located.

Sárosi

1881

Franz Sárosi (Schauer), Atala. Opera in five acts.  Libretto by Anton Varady.  Performed Budapest, Nemzeti Szinhaz, 1881.

Monica

1882

Monica Monica (pseud. for Emily M. Thackwell), The Song of an Indian Waterfall. "Gairsapa."  [May be east Indian.]

Guglielmi

1884

Filippo Guglielmi (b. 1859), Atala. Opera. Performed Milano, Teatro Carcano, 1884.

Solomon

1884

Edward Solomon (1855-1895). Pocohantas, or The Great White Pearl.  Comic opera produced at the Empire Theatre (1884). Libretto by Sidney Grundy.  Song: “Thee Alone” (Serenade) Published London: Boosey & Co., 1884. Song: “A Fashionable General” also published 1885. 

Troyer

1884

Carlos Troyer (1837-1920), Song of the Sunset Land (voice and piano with SATB chorus. Text by Richard S. White. Published San Francisco: A. Waldteufel, 1884, 3rd edition Caption title: “State national song of California.” First line: “There stood upon the mountain crest.”  First line of chorus: “Nor did they dream in little space.” [12 songs, “Western” themes, but no specific Indian subjects].

Corder

1885

Frederick and Henrietta Corder, The Noble Savage. Operetta. Performed by the Alice Barton Opera Co. at Brighton Aquarium, London, 1885.

Gleason

1885

Frederick Grant Gleason (1848-1903), Montezuma (grand romantic opera in 3 acts; unpubl.; unperformed). Libretto by the composer. 

Prior

1885

J. August Prior, Die Spanier in Peru.  Opera for two evenings.  Librettos by O. Erichs.  Performed Nordhausen, Tivolitheater.

Foote

1886

Arthur William Foote (1853-1937). The Farewell of Hiawatha Op. 11, for baritone solo, male chorus and orchestra. Published Boston: Schmidt and Co., 1886, 27 pp. Reprinted 1914. Based on Longfellow’s text.  First performed 12 May 1886 by the Apollo Club of Boston under B. J. Lang.

Hendricks

1886

Welland Hendricks. Pocahontas, a “burleque operetta in two acts” Text published Chicago: T. S. Denison & Co., 1886. Ballad opera with adapted familiar tunes, some from Gilbert and Sullivan operettas.

Troyer

1886

Carlos Troyer, Apache Chief Geronimo's Own Medicine Song.  Voice and piano. Published San Francisco: Henry Grobe, 1886.

MacDowell

1887

Edward MacDowell (1860-1908). Sketches for a symphonic poem to be titled “Hiawatha and Minnehaha.”

Ulrich

1887

John Ulrich, Bamboula Dance for the piano.  No. 2 from West Indian Melodies. Also arranged for orchestra.

Delius

1888

Frederick Delius (1862-34). Hiawatha (tone poem for orchestra, ms.).  According to Threlfall, the work was begun in late 1887 and completed in January 1888.  Of the 90-page full score in the Archives of the Delius Trust London, pp. 4-17 and 46-53 are missing. Delius incorporated sections of this work into other compositions.

Grethen

1888

Adolph Grethen, Indian War-dance, from the opera Manitou, for the piano-forte. Published Minneapolis, A. Grethen, 1888.

Pfennig

1888

Albert Pfennig, On the Trail. “Indian War March.”  For piano solo.  London: Bowerman & Co., 1888.

Reiset

1888

Marie Felicie Clemence de Reiset (“Vicomtesse de Grandval,” 1830-1907), Atala. Opera in 1 act.  Libretto by Louis Gallet.  Performed Paris, 1888.  Music is lost.

Maccartney

1889

Robert Hyslop Maccartney, Gill's Indian Club Exercises for use in schools, with musical accompaniments adapted and arranged for Piano-forte or Harmonium, etc.  Musical Drill

Fillmore

1890

John Comfort Fillmore (1843-1898). Indian Fantasia, No. 1, for full orchestra.  Based on the song “Hae-thu-ska.” Composer’s footnote:  “The song which forms the staple of this Fantasia is one of a large number noted down from the singing of the Omaha Indians by Alice C. Fletcher of the Peabody Museum. The words mean ‘the affairs of men are in the hands of the Gods.  When they speak, men obey.’” [12-page ms. orchestra score at LC; copy also at Loeb Library, Harvard University.]

Gilbert

1890

Henry Franklin Belknap Gilbert (1866-1928). Gilbert transcribed Indian music from cylinders sent back to Boston from the Hemenway Expedition.  Became involved with the photographer Curtis at this point.

Knapp

1890

John Knapp, Indian Love. Song, the words by Barry Cornwall. London & New York: Novello, Ewel, & Co., 1890.

Sousa

1890

John Philip Sousa (1854-1932), Adaptations of American Indian Melodies in his National, Patriotic and Typical Airs of All Lands Published Philadelphia, 1890. 

Bellstedt

1891

Herman Bellstedt, Indian War Dance.  Orchestra music (with 18 parts). Published Cincinnati, Ohio: John Church, 1891.

Bott

1891

Jean Joseph Bott, Indian Cradle Song for Violin & Piano. Op. 46.

deKoven

1891

Reginald De Koven (1859-1920), Indian Love Song.  Voice and piano.  Words by F. E. Weatherly.  London: Chappell & Co., 1891.

Gaggs

1891

Oliver Gaggs, The Minnehaha Lancers.  For piano solo.  London: Francis, Day, & Hunter, 1891.

Hamilton

1891

R. H. Hamilton, arr. and ed.  Cabin and Plantation Songs, - as sung by the Hampton students. Arranged by J. P. Fenner and F. G. Rathbun. To which are added a few Indian Songs and Songs of the students of the Normal School, Tuskegee, Alabama. Enlarged Edition Fenner. Thomas P 1891.

Prescott

1891

Caroline Prescott, Indian Summer. Waltz.  For piano solo.

Thomas

1891

Arthur Thomas, Indian Serenade. Canoe Song, with violin or violoncello accompaniment ad lib. Written and composed by A. Thomas [Edition,  also of 1899]

Baldwin

1892

Ralph Lyman Baldwin (1872-1943), Wanita, musical burlesque. Published Boston: Miles & Thompson, c.1892. [Sibley M1503.B182W]

Cowen

1892

Frederic Hymen Cowen, Onaway, Awake, Beloved!  For low voice and piano.  Text from Longfellow’s Song of Hiawatha.  Published in Longfellow’s Songs. Published Boston: O. Ditson, 1892.  London: E. Ashdown, 1892.

de LoĎtz

1892

Paul de LoĎtz, An Indian Ride. Descriptive piece for piano. Arr. in 1896 for Mandoline with Accompaniments for Guitar or Pianoforte and Bells - ad lib. - by A. St. Clair

Folville

1892

Juliette Folville (b. 1870), Atala. Opera in two acts after Chateaubriand. Libretto by Paul Collin.  Performed Lille, ThéČtre Municipal, 1892.  Published LiŹge: Vve Léop. Muraille, 1894.

Gomes

1892

Carlos Gomes. Colombo. “Vocal-Symphonic Poem.” Text by Albino Falanca. Published in Milan.

Hewitt

1892

Percy M. Hewitt, West Indian Dance for the pianoforte. Published London: Ransford & Son, 1892.

Schoenefeld

1892

Schoenefeld, Henry (1857-1936).  Rural Sympony (orchestra, New York, 1892);

•“Suite Caractéristique,” op. 15. No date (n.d).

•Two “Indian Legends” (orchestra, n.d.);

•a pantomime-ballet “Machicanta” (the last three are cited in the 1928 Grove American Supplement, 253; Elson calls the ballet “Wachicanta” [p. 377]; so does Hughes in American Composers [1900]);

Die drei Indianer (“ode” for male chorus, solo, and orchestra; unpubl.; no known performance).

Zöllner

1892

Heinrich Zöllner (1854-1941), Indianischer Liebesgesang (“Indian Love Song”). Text from Longfellow’s Hiawatha. Composed for the 50th anniversary of the Kölner Männergesangverein (founded 1842);

Bristow

1893

George Frederick Bristow (1825-1898), “Niagara Symphony,” op. 62  for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra.  [One source says incomplete at his death, no publ. date, 154-page ms. score (no date) at NYPL.  Score for orchestra only, with choral cues.  Choral part appears separately.]

Burton

1893

Frederick Russell Burton (1861-1909). “The Dance of Paupukkeewis” from Hiawatha for chorus and orchestra. [10-p. ms. score at the LC.] [Cited in the 1928 Grove American Supplement as “one of the first attempts to use Indian themes.” Rupert Hughes writes (American Composers, 1900): “In this work use is made of an actual Indian theme, which was jotted down by H. E. Krehbiel, and is worked up delightfully in the cantata, and incessant thudding of a drum in an incommensurate rhythm giving it a deadly barbaric tone.”]

Coerne

1893

Louis Adolphe Coerne (1870-1922). Hiawatha, Op. 18 (symphonic poem. Finished Munich, Apr. 16, 1893. Published Boston: Miles and Thompson, 1894. Dedicated to “Seiner Excellenz Freiherrn von Perfall in München.” First American perf. in 1894 by Boston Symphony Orchestra in Cambridge, Mass. under composer’s direction. [Coerne’s autograph full score of Hiawatha is in the Boston Public Library, Music Dept. (M.451.100).]

CONTENTS.--4 Movements: 1. “Hiawatha’s Birth and Childhood; His Struggle with his Father Mudjekeewis, the West Wind,” 2. “Hiawatha’s Wooing of Minnehaha,” 3. “Dance of Pau-Puk-Keewis and Song of Chibiabos at the Wedding Feast,” 4a. “Death of Minnehaha,” and 4b. “The White Man’s Foot.”  

Dvoák

1893

Antonín Dvoák (1841-1904), Sketches from his proposed opera on Hiawatha; apparently these went into his Symphony No. 9, “From the New World.” Theme from the slow movement of the symphony was set to text in 1922 by Dvoák’s pupil William Arms Fischer as “Goin’ Home.” Early performances of this work are numerous. First performed at Carnegie Hall in New York, 16 Dec. 1893 by the Philharmonic Society under Anton Seidl.

Loehr

1893

Richard Harvey Loehr, “An Indian Love Song,” No. 9 in “Album of Ten Songs.  Words translated from Heine by E. Radford. 

Nugent

1893

Claude Nugent, The Wild West Show.  Song for voice and piano.  Written by George Nugent & Arthur Waugh. Published London: Hopwood and Crew, 1893.

Troyer

1893

Carlos Troyer, Two ZuĖi Songs “transcribed and harmonized by Carlos Troyer; to his friend Prof. Dr. Frank Hamilton Cushing, Director of the Hemenway Archaeological Expedition.” For voice and piano. Published San Francisco: Sherman, Clay, & Co., 1893,  7pp. Later published with text in the Wa-Wan Press; see 1904

CONTENTS: 1. “ZuĖian Lullaby: An Incantation Upon a Sleeping Infant,” – 2. “ZuĖian Lover’s Wooing.”

Waller

1893

Waller, Henry (1864-?).  Ogalalla. Opera. First performed in Chicago by the Bostonians, Feb. 20, 1893.

Abram

1894

Edward J. Abram, The Indian Sun Dance, etc. New York. [copy at BL]

Conterno

1894

Giovanni E. Conterno, Aria e coro. – Quadrille ("Indian”).  Text by G. Franco. (On Indian airs.) - Danse comique. From Punch and Judy.  E. Boggetti.  [Source unknown.]

Dvoák

1894

Antonin Dvoák,  Sonatina, op. 100 for violin and piano. Published Berlin: N. Simrock, 1894.  [Dvoák’s secretary Josef Jan Kovarík indicated (in an unpublished letter, see Beckermann) that Dvoák used the Minnehaha Falls (near St. Paul, Minnesota) as an inspiration for the 2nd movement, Larghetto, which is often called “Indian canzonetta.” This movement was published separately in 1894 by Simrock as op. 100, no. 2.  Transcribed in 1910 by Fritz Kreisler as “Indian Lament in G minor” for violin and piano (Berlin: Simrock) and also by Gaspar Cassado for cello & piano in 1914 (New York: Carl Fischer, 1914; reprint, New York: International Music Co., 1947). Kreisler popularized the piece in his recitals under that title. [Sibley M236.D988I] also see “In process” (1914, 6 pp.)  It was arranged by Otto Langey in 1918 (see) as one of two “Indian” pieces for silent film accompaniment.]

Fillmore

1894

John Comfort Fillmore, “Folk-music of the Omaha Indians for young pianists collected and arranged by John Comfort Fillmore” Published Milwaukee: Joseph Flanner; 7 pp.

Kell

1894

Nelson T. Kell, Little Papoose. “Indian Lullaby.”  Words by C. Warman.  New York City: Widmer-Stigler, 1894.

Beach

1895

Amy Marcy Cheney Beach (1867-1944). “An Indian Lullaby” Op. 57, no. 3, for four women’s voices and piano. N.p.: Bryan, Taylor and Co., N.d.  Anonymous poem. Cover portrays countryside with wigwams.  Beach later used the music of the Lullaby as a basis for he Theme and Variations for Flute and String Quartet, Op. 80 (1920). Reprinted in Three Centuries of American Music, gen. ed. Martha Furman Schleifer and Sam Dennison, Vol. 8, American Chamber Music, ed. John Graziano (N.p.: G. K. Hall, 1991), 351-55.

Crook, J

1895

John Crook, Indian Lullaby from The New Barmaid.  London: Hopwood & Crew, 1895.

MacDowell

1895

Edward MacDowell, Second Orchestral Suite, op. 48, “Indian” (orchestra, 1895).  First performed in New York City by the Boston Symphony on Jan. 23, 1896. Adapted for piano four-hands in 1897. [Original sketch of the “Dirge” [1891?] is in the Special Music Collections at the Boston Public Library.]  

FIVE MOVEMENTS.--1) “Legend,” 2) “Love Song,” 3) “In War-Time,” 4) “Dirge,” 5) “Village Festival.” 

Arranged by Otto Taubman for piano solo.  New York: Associated Music Publishers, 1933.

Stone

1895

Fred S. Stone and Edward Liggett, “The Indian: Two-Step.” Published Detroit: Central Music Publishing Co., 1895.

Tipton

1895

Lewis Campbell Tipton, Powhatan, Opera. Text by William A. Baker.  Composed “with John A. West.” First Performed Evanston, IL.

Coleridge-Taylor

1896

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912). Hiawathan Sketches, Op. 16 for violin and piano. Published Augener, 1897. Reprinted 1908. First performed in the Salle Erard (London) in a joint concert with the African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. [These pieces were the composer’s first venture into the Hiawatha legend.]

Contents: 1. “A tale,” – 2. “A song,” – 3. “A dance.”

Goldmark

1896

Rubin Goldmark (1872-1936). Hiawatha Overture (orchestra). First performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra 13 Jan., 1900. [Composed while living in the Rocky Mountain region.  “The composer made no attempt to use Indian folk-tunes” (Philip Hale, program notes)]

Leonard

1896

A. E. B. Leonard, Wigwam Dance for piano solo. Published New York: Howley, Haviland & Co. 1896.

MacDowell

1896

Edward MacDowell, From an Indian Lodge.  No. 5 from Woodland Sketches, Op. 51.  Piano solo. Published Boston & New York: Arthur P. Schmidt, 1899. 2 pp. Arranged by James Wehr for brass quartet (2 trp/horn/tromb/tuba), published Winter Park, FL: Wehr's Music House, 1995.

Miersch

1896

Paul Friedrich Theodore Miersch (1868-?) Indian Rhapsody (orchestra, 1896) First performed in New York at a concert of the Manuscript Society, seventh season at Chickering Hall, 3 Dec. 1896, under the direction of Silas Pratt (orchestra of 55). [Reviewer in The Pianist wrote: “Mr. Miersch’s ‘Indian Rhapsody’ made the hit of the evening and is likely to be heard elsewhere.  It is written on motifs derived from the songs and dances of the Ute Indians, and displays much originality and ingenuity of treatment.”] Music is lost.

Culwick

1897

James Cooksey Culwick, The War Dance. A Part-Song, unaccompanied. Words by Thomas Moore. Published London: C. Vincent, 1897.

Stearns

1897

Theodore Stearns (1880-1935). Before the Door of the Wigwam (suite for full orchestra from “Hiawatha’s Wedding”; unpublished). Score is signed: Würzburg, Bavaria, 29 April, 1897. [Score in Fleisher Music Collection.]

Tempest

1897

Robert Tempest, “Indian Cradle-Song.”  Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1897.

Walter

1897

August Walter (1821-1896). “Hiawatha” Symphony. Performed Brooklyn, New York, Dec. 9, 1897. 

Woodman

1897

Raymond Huntington Woodman, “Indian Cradle Song,” no. 3 of Five Slumber Songs. New York: G. Schirmer, 1897.

Boatwright

1898

Thomas Boatwright, Indian March. (The Diamond Jubilee.) For piano solo.  London: Klene & Co, 1898.  [Probably East Indian.]

Burton

1898

Frederick Russell Burton,  Hiawatha (“dramatic cantata” for chorus and orchestra after Longfellow; expanded version of his earlier single-movement work, q.v. 1882). Full score (303 pp.) and vocal score (170 pp.) published Boston: Ditson, 1898; the latter reprinted 1908). Includes composer’s introductory notes.  Dedicated to the “Yonkers Choral Society.” In three parts. 


CONTENTS: Part I : . Prelude – 2. Introductory Chorus – 3. “Hiawatha and Mudjekeewis.” Part II: 1. “Hiawatha’s Wooing” – 2. “The Wedding Festivities” (a. “Onaway! awake, beloved!” -- b. The dance of Paupukkeewis -- c. “When I think of my beloved.” Part III: 1. “The Famine” – 2. “Hiawatha’s Vision” – 3. “Hiawatha’s Departure.” 

 

• Burton is also believed to have composed an “Ojibway Symphony” (see 1907 bibliographical entry; ms. score and parts at the LC). [also bio in the 1928 Grove American Supplement and Thompson, International Cyclopedia]  (The finale of the cantata is printed in Burton’s posthumous American Primitive Music, 1909.)  [copy at BL]

Coleridge-Taylor

1898

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Scenes from the “Song of Hiawatha”  (3 cantatas--or an oratorio in 3 parts--for soli, chorus, and orchestra).  Part 1 (Op. 30, no. 1), Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast (first performed Royal College of London, 1898); Part 2 (Op. 30, no. 2), The Death of Minnehaha (1899); and part 3 (Op. 30, no. 4), Hiawatha’s Departure (1900); First complete performance in England in 1900. In U.S. (by the Cecilia Society): Haiwatha’s Wedding Feast, Boston, Mar. 14, (or 12?) 1900; Hiawatha’s Departure, Boston, Dec. 5, 1900; The Death of Minnehaha (together with Hiawatha’s Departure) on Dec. 2, 1902.  First “official” complete performance in America was in Easton, Pa. on May 5, 1903 by the Orpheus Oratorio Society under Charles Knauss.  First actual performance (with two pianos) was by an all Black chorus for a largely Black audience of some 2000 in April, 1901 at the Metropolitan African Methodist Church in Washington, D.C. under John T. Layton.  In 1904, C.-T. himself came to Washington to conduct a complete Hiawatha with the U.S. Marine Band (expanded) in Constitution Hall, a performance which apparently made a splash in the press.

Hadley

1898

Henry Hadley (1871-1937), Lelawala: A Legend of Niagara, Op. 13.  One of Hadley’s six “ballades for mixed chorus and orchestra.”  Poem by G.F.R. Anderson.  Vocal score published Boston: Arthur Schmidt, 1898. Orchestra score and parts in mss.

Kroeger

1898

Ernest Richard Kroeger (1862-1934). “Hiawatha” (“symphonic overture.” Performed by the Thomas Orchestra, acc. to Elson, 1925, in Omaha for the 1898 Exposition). Also mentioned in a St. Louis Symphony Orchestra program from the 1920s in which Kroeger conducted. “Hiawatha” is supposed to have used actual Indian themes. Ms. score (pencil, 57 pp.) at the LC; undated. 

CONTENTS (from Longfellow): 1. “The Council of Hiawatha; Manitou’s Promise of a Prophet and Teacher” -- 2. “Hiawatha’s Youth” -- 3. “Hiawatha’s Wooing” -- 4. “The Hunting of Pau-Puk-Keewis” -- 5. “The Famine and Death of Minnehaha” -- 6. “Hiawatha’s Departure.”

Le Brunn

1898

George Le Brunn, The Indian Prince. [Song.] Written by A. Hall. London: Francis, Day, & Hunter, 1898.

Ridley

1898

Sebastian Claude Ridley, The Indian Expedition. Descriptive Fantasia for the piano. London: Evans & Co., 1898.  [May be East Indian.]

Seidl

1898

Seidl, Anton (1850-1898).  Manabozho.  Unfinished opera based on the Hiawatha legend. [Seidl Collection is at Columbia University.]

Horrocks

1899

Amy Elise Horrocks, An Indian Lullaby. Song, words by M. Gillington. London: Houghton & Co., 1899.  [Another edition 1904]

Slaughter

1899

Walter Slaughter (1860-1908). Incidental music to The Sioux.  Drama on Western topic at the Oxford Theatre, London.

Castro

1900

Ricardo Castr, Atizamba. Opera on an Aztec subject.  Mexico.

Cattelani

1900

Ferruccio Cattelani (1867-1932), Atahualpa. Opera in four acts.  Libretto in Italian by C. F. Scotti.  Performed Buenos Aires.

Evans

1900

George Evans, Chihuahua (Cheewawa), An Indian Love Song.  New York: Howley, Haviland, and Co., 1900.

Farwell

1900

Arthur Farwell (1872-1952), Academic Overture “Cornell,” Op. 9. First performed Cornell University Orchestra, Ithaca, New York; approx. 12 min.). [Score is lost; parts survive.]

Henschel

1900

Carl Henschel, “Indian Lullaby,” No. 4 of A Camp in the Woods.  For piano solo.  Chicago: S. Brainard’s Sons, 1900.

CONTENTS: 1. Patrol of the Bears -- 2. Reynard the Fox -- 3. The Meeting of the Stags -- 4. Indian Lullaby -- 5. The Chase -- 6. The Elf Dance.

Rodwell

1900

Ernest Hunter Rodwell, Indian Lover's Prayer. Song for voice and piano with words and music by Rodwell. London: C. Vincent, 1900.

Tipping

1900

Frank Tipping, Indian Dance for the Pianoforte. Published London: E. Ashdown, 1900. 

Farwell

1901

Arthur Farwell, American Indian Melodies (18 “melodies harmonized from the original Indian” for piano, 1900), Wa-Wan Press, 1901, vol. 1, no. 2; Also 10 of these edited and arranged for the piano, with an introduction, by Arthur Farwell, Op. 11. Recently reprinted Boca Raton, Flordia: Masters Music Publications, 1999. Also 13 of these arr. (voice and piano, 1901-04, in ms.) and 1 arr. (mixed chorus and piano).

 
CONTENTS: 1. “Approach of the Thunder God,” – 2. “Choral,” – 3. “Ichibuzzi,” – 4. “Inketunga’s Thunder Song,” – 5. “The Mother’s Vow,”  -- 6. “The Old Man’s Love Song,” – 7.  “Song of the Deathless Voice,”  -- 8. “Song of the Ghost Dance,” – 9.  “Song of the Leader,” – 10. “Song to the Spirit”

Hadley

1901

Henry Hadley, Symphony No. 2 in F minor (“The Four Seasons”), third movement, “Summer.” Published Boston: Arthur P. Schmidt, 190.  First performance of “Summer” under Hadley by the Manhattan Symphony at the Waldorf-Astoria, 16 Jan. 1900 (Hadley’s conducting debut). Performed complete in 1901, New York City and 1902, Chicago Symphony under Theodore Thomas.

Kaun

1901

Hugo Kaun (1863-1932), Zwei symphonische Dichtungen nach Longfellows Hiawatha: Minnehaha & Hiawatha, Op. 43.  1. Minnehaha. No. 2. Hiawatha. Published Hamburg und Leipzig: D. Rahter, 1902. Minnehaha first performed Berlin, Oct. 17, 1901. First performance in the U.S. by the Chicago Symphony, see program for Feb. 7, 1903, and the Boston Symphony, see program for Jan. 29, 1904.  Also performed again by Chicago Symphony, March 29-30, 1912.

MacDowell

1901

Edward MacDowell, Indian Idyll.  No. 6 in New England Idyls, Op. 62.  Piano solo. Published Boston & New York: Arthur P. Schmidt, 1902. 3 pp. 

Moret

1901

Neil Moret (a.k.a. Charles N. Daniels, 1878-1943), Hiawatha, Op. 6. “A Summer Idyl,” also “A Romantic Love Song.” Piano solo. Dedicated to Mr. Harvey Deardorff. Published St. Louis: Daniels & Russell--Moret’s own company). Reprinted Detroit: Whitney Warner Publ. Co., 1902  (See complete score in pic file.) 

Browne

1902

Raymond A. Browne, Pocahontas. Indian Dance and Two-Step. Piano solo. New York: Mayo Music Company, 1902.

Burton

1902

Frederick Russell Burton, “My Bark Canoe” (A Song of Absence and Longing,” “Old Shoes,” “Parting,” and “Hiawatha’s Death Song” (The Lake Sheen).  From Songs of the Ojibways. Translated from the Indian Musical Play "Hiawatha" and harmonized by F. R. Burton.

Farwell

1902

Arthur Farwell, Dawn, Op. 12, fantasy for piano on two Indian themes from Fletcher’s Omaha collection. Published 1902 by the Wa-Wan Press, vol. 1, no. 4. First performed 1903. Arranged in shorter version for orchestra (Dawn: Fantasy on Two Indian Themes) and performed at the St. Louis Exposition in 1904 and at a concert of the American Music Society in New York City in 1909. Arranged (titled simply Dawn) for piano and chamber orchestra (1909) and performed by People’s Symphony at Carnegie Hall (first performed Pasadena, Calif., 1926).

Farwell

1902

Arthur Farwell, Ichibuzzh, for piano. Published Wa-Wan Press, 1902. Based on a theme from American Indian Melodies (1901).

Farwell

1902

Arthur Farwell, The Domain of Hurakan (piano, Wa-Wan Press, 1902), the latter arr. for full orchestra in 1910.

Grainger

1902

Percy Grainger (1882-1961), “The Inuit” for mixed chorus in 6 parts. Published London: Schott, 1912. [Kay Dreyfus (who edited the letters of Percy Grainger) wrote: “Grainger’s setting of the 8-line verse at the head of Kipling’s story ‘Quiquern’ in The Second Jungle Book (1895).] 

Herbert

1902

Victor Herbert, Pax Americana. Suite written for the World’s Fair, Buffalo, NY.  [The work is a racial portrait of America and opens with a musical representation of American Indians.]

Hoffmann

1902

Max Hoffmann (words and music), Eulah! Eulah! (My Indian maid).  An Indian love song.  Published New York: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co., 1902.

Knight

1902

Richard Knight, An Indian Dance, for Pianoforte

Kroeger

1902

Ernest Richard Kroeger  “(Ten) American Character Sketches” op. 53, for piano solo, nos. 7, “The Indian Lament,” and 9. “Indian Air with Variations.”  Pieces published separately, St. Louis: Thiebes-Stierlin Music, 1902.  5 pp. and 4 pp.

Ball

1903

Eric Ball (1903-1989), Fantasy. Indian Summer.  For brass band.  Rpnt, Watford: R. Smith and Co, 1976.
CONTENTS: 1. The Great Chief speaks -- 2. By the cool Waters -- 3. Totem Dance -- 4. Hymn to the great Spirit. 

Burton

1903

Frederick Russell Burton, E-wa-yea, my little Owlet. Cradle Song for Contralto, etc. [With accompaniment for Violin and P. F.] From the Hiawatha Cantata.

Burton

1903

Frederick Russell Burton, When I think of my Beloved. Contralto Solo, etc.  From the Hiawatha Cantata.

Burton

1903

Frederick Russell Burton, “Hiawatha: Additions for an Indian play,” for vocal soloists and orchestra; additions to the Desbarat Hiawatha pageant apparently for its tour “to the cities”. [Includes an overture with a declamatory song for bass voice, a funeral march, a set of variations on the Ojibway song “Old Shoes,” several interludes, and a finale for solo voice, chorus, and orchestra.]

Coe

1903

Saidee Knowland Coe (1864-1905). Melodrama of Hiawatha for speaker and piano. Published Chicago: Clayton F.Summy, 1905; 49 pp.  Selections from the poem by Longfellow. “Written and dedicated to Isabel Garghill Beecher.” [Score prefaced by a full page of “thematic material” and well as composer’s introduction which discusses pros and cons of the use of folk music.]

Connolly

1903

Charles Mitchell Connolly, Colorow. (Indian dance). For piano solo.  New York: Witmark & Sons, 1903.

Copeland

1903

Leon Copeland, An Indian soldier's request. Published Milwaukee, WI: Scovell & Braun, 1903

Cowen

1903

Frederick Cowen, Indian Rhapsody for orchestra. Published London: Boosey, 1903. Arranged for piano by Adolf Schmid, Boosey, 1904. [Sibley M1045. C874I] Performed in U.S. in 1903, Pittsburgh.

Dulmage

1903

Will E. Dulmage, The Wooing of Sha-wah-wah. Indian Two-Step Intermezzo. For piano solo.  Detroit: Stone and Dulmage, 1903.

Friedman

1903

Leo Friedman, Wigwam Dance. A Reservation Innovation. For piano solo. Published New York: M. Witmark & Sons, 1903.

Grey

1903

Vivian Grey (Mabel McKinley), Anona (“Intermezzo - Two-Step”).  Instrumental. Published New York: Leo Feist, 134 West 37th Street, 1903. Also published as a vocal:  Anona (“Indian Serenade”), for voice and piano, New York: Leo Feist, 1903.  First Line: “In the western state of Arizona, lived an Indian maid.”  First Line of Chorus: “My sweet Anona, in Arizona, there is no other maid I'd serenade.”

Hager

1903

Frederick Hager, Laughing Water: Characteristic for Piano; Instrumental. Published Sol Bloom, New York.

Hoyt

1903

Richmond F. Hoyt, Princess Pocahontas. March and two-step.  Arranged by Hugo O. Marks. For piano solo. Published New York, Chicago: Windsor Music, 1903. Also published as a vocal: Princess Pocahontas. Words by Al. Trahern. Arranged by Gus Gebert, etc. Published New York; Windsor Music, 1903.

Johnson

1903

Lee Johnson, Ramona: Lily of the Prairie.  “Indian Intermezzo or two-step. “ For piano solo.  Published London: Chappell, 1903. Also published as a vocal: Ramona: Lily of the Prairie.  “Indian love song.”  Published London: Chappell, 1903.

Kahn

1903

Carl Kahn, Kamona. An Indian Intermezzo.  For piano solo.

Koninsky

1903

Sadie Koninsky, A Wigwam Courtship. Intermezzo.  For piano. Published Troy, N.Y.: Edw. M. Koninsky & Bros., 1903. Also published as a vocal: A Wigwam Courtship: Intermezzo. Published New York; Edward M. Koninsky & Bros., 1903.

Loering

1903

Paul Loering, Minnehaha. Danse grotesque. Also arranged as a piano solo. Piano acc. [and orchestral parts]. Published Boston: White-Smith Music Pub. Co., 1903.

Loomis

1903

Harvey Worthington Loomis (1865-1930), Lyrics of the Red Man, op. 76 (piano),  Book 1 (5 pieces) first published by the Wa-Wan Press, vol. 2, no. 12. 


CONTENTS:  1. “Music of the Calumet” – 2. “A Song of Sorrow” – 3. “Around the Wigwam,” – 4. “The Silent Conqueror,” – 5. “Warriors’ Dance.”

(For Book 2, see 1904.)

Moret

1903

Neil Moret, Hiawatha: His Song to Minnehaha. Words added to Moret’s 1901 piano “summer idyl” Hiawatha by James O’Dea and published with the revised title by Whitney Warner, Detroit, 1903.

Morgan

1903

Robert Orlando Morgan, Indian Songs.  Op. 34. For Contralto or Baritone.  Words: anonymous Indian songs. 


CONTENTS: 1. An Indian Serenade -- 2. An Indian Lullaby – 3. An Indian Squaw’s Song.

Muniz

1903

Louis G. Muniz, “Be the Sunlight of my Heart.” Indian love song. Words by Roy. L. McCardell. New York: Jos. W. Stern, 1903.

Read

1903

Ezra Read, Wild West. Descriptive Fantasia.  For piano solo. Published London: W. Paxton, 1903.

Stewart

1903

Humphrey J. Stewart (1856-1932), Montezuma.  “Grove-Play” written for the San Francisco Bohemian Club’s summer encampment. Text by L. A. Robertson.

Van Alstyne

1903

Egbert Van Alstyne, Navajo (Navajo)  (“Indian Characteristique”). Lyrics by Harry H. Williams. Published New York: Shapiro, Remick, and Co.  Arranged also as a “March and Two-Step” published by Shapiro, Bernstein, and Co., New York. Arranged for military band, 1905.

Waller

1903

Henry Waller, Dance of the Sun Feast. - American-Indian. - Arranged by the Composer. For piano solo. New York: Boosey and Hawkes, 1903.

Wenrich

1903

Percy Wenrich, Wenonah. An Indian Intermezzo. Published Detroit: Whitney-Warner Pub. Co., 1903. “Respectfully Dedicated to Winona Winters.” 

Adams

1904

Robert J. Adams, How I Love That Man: That Kickapoo Indian Man. Lyrics by James O’Dea  (1871-1914). Published New York: Shapiro, Remick & Co., 1904.  (Also London: Francis, Day, & Hunter, 1904.)

Blake

1904

Louis Blake, My little Indian Maid. [Song.] New York: Theatrical Music Supply Co., 1904.

Brachman

1904

James W. Brachman, My Iroquois Squaw. [Song.] Words by Arthur Trevelyan. Published New York: T. B. Harms & Co., 1904.

Brown

1904

Raymond A. Brown, On the Warpath. A Wild West Two-Step. Published New York: F. B. Haviland, 1904.

Brownhold

1904

Fred Brownhold, My Indian Queen. [Song.] Words by H. W. Hayes, etc

Brymn

1904

James Tim Brymn, Rowena. A characteristic Indian love song. Words & music by J. T. Brymn.

Cadman

1904

Charles Wakefield Cadman (1881-1946), The Tryst: An Indian Night Song. Published New York: Schuberth, 1904. Text by Nelle Eberhart.  [Acc. to Perison, the poem by Nelle R. Eberhart was superficially “Indian,” a love song of a brave awaiting the arrival of the maiden, Shanewis, in an idyllic prairie setting.]

Cole

1904

Rossetter Gleason Cole (1866-1952), Hiawatha’s Wooing, Op. 20, “A Melodrama.” Recitation with piano accompaniment. Published Boston: Schmidt, 1904. First performed Dec. 19, 1904 following a reading of Cole’s essay, “Musical Inspirations from Longfellow” at the Chicago Literary Club. The 28-page typescript of the essay and an unmarked copy of the score are at the Newberry Library, Chicago. 

Couchois

1904

G. J. Couchois, Ogarita. Indian Intermezzo. “A metrical & rhythmical novelty.”  For piano solo.

Crook

1904

John Crook, “Indian Dance” from the incidental music to J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan. Duke of York’s Theatre, London. Crook’s complete score of incidental music to Peter Pan was published in London: W. Paxton, 1905.

Dewey

1904

James G. Dewey, "Nakokus." An Indian idylle.  For piano solo.

Farwell

1904

Arthur Farwell, Navajo War Dance (unpublished). Not the same as the “Navajo War Dance” in From Mesa and Plain (1905); edited by John Kirkpatrick in 1940 and published as Navajo War Dance No. 2 (Music Press, 1947).

Farwell

1904

Arthur Farwell, “Toward the Dream” (piano), Wa-Wan Press, vol 3, no. 20.

Fischer

1904

J. Henri Fischer, Moccasin Dance: Indian characteristic.  Dance piece. Published Burlington, Iowa: Fischer Music Pub. Co., 1904.

Friedman

1904

Leo Friedman, Song Bird. Indian love song. Words by Bartley C. Costello.

Fry

1904

William H. Fry, Montauk Waltzes. Instrumental. Published: Sterling Piano Co., Brooklyn, New York. 

Hartz

1904

B. Hartz, The Irish Indian. (Intermezzo.)  For piano solo.

Johnson

1904

J. Rosamond Johnson (1873-1954), The Pretty little Squaw from Utah.  Song for voice and piano. Words by Bob Cole. Published New York: Jos. W. Stern & Co., 1904.

Johnson

1904

J. Rosamond Johnson (1873-1954). Big Indian Chief.  Two-step, Introducing "The Maid of Timbuctoo.”  Arr. by George Rosey. For piano solo. Also published as a vocal: Big Indian Chief for voice and piano.  Lyrics by Bob Cole. Published New York: Joseph W. Stern (34 East 21st St.), 1904. First Line: “In the wilds of Arizona, where the hungry coyote's shrills.” First Line of Chorus: “Big Chief love um little Kick-a-poo maiden, Love um heap much too.”  [Written Especially For the 16th Annual Production of The Mask and Wig Club of the University of Pennsylvania.]

Kaiser

1904

Joseph J. Kaiser, Uncas, The Last of the Mohicans (“Characteristic March Two-Step”); Instrumental; “Dedicated to My Friend, Thomas H. Moore.”  Published New York: Joseph J. Kaiser Music, 1904.

Kenney

1904

Eugene R. Kenney, Obeja: Indian Love Serenade.  New York: Rice Music Co., 1904

Kroeger

1904

Kroeger, Ernest Richard.  March of the Indian Phantoms, for orchestra.  Written for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904.  Published for piano solo in 1912.  Also arranged for piano four-hands (Presser, 1916), 9 pp.

•“Indian War Dance” for piano (undated)

•“Atala” (overture, orchestra, undated)

Lehman

1904

Samuel Lehman, Little Indian Maid. March, “Intermezzo.”  For piano solo (march). Also published as a vocal: My little Indian Maid. Words by Maurice Stonehill. New York: T. B. Harms, 1904.

Levi

1904

Maurice Levi, Big Indian and His Little Maid.  From Higgledy-Piggledy.  Lyrics by  Edgar Smith (1857-1938). Published Chicago: Chas. K. Harris, 1904. Illustrated title page: “Weber & Ziegfeld present Higgledy-Piggledy.”

Liebling

1904

Estelle Liebling, Indian Love Song. [Song.] Words by Mrs. John Philip Sousa.  Cincinnati: John Church, 1904.

Lindstedt

1904

Adolph Lindstedt, Papoose Dance. Danse des Enfants. Marche Indienne. Arranged by Hugo O. Marks.  For piano solo. Published Chicago, New York: Windsor Music Co., 1904.

Loomis

1904

Harvey Worthington Loomis, Lyrics of the Red Man, op. 76, for piano. Book 2 (8 pieces) first published by the Wa-Wan Press, vol. 3, no.4. 


CONTENTS: 1. “Prayer to Wakonda,” – 2. “On the War-Path,” – 3. “Ripe Corn Dance,” – 4. “Evening at the Lodge,” – 5. “The Chattering Squaw,” – 6. “Scalp Dance,” – 7. “The Thunder God and the Rainbow,” – 8. “The Warrior’s Last Word.”
 

(For Book 1, see 1903.) 

Macpherson

1904

Stewart Macpherson, “Six Songs based on Iroquois Melodies, arranged and edited by Stewart Macpherson.” For voice and piano. Published London: Joseph William, 1904. Text in English by M. C. Gillington and In German by Blanche Marchesi. 


CONTENTS: 1. “The Reedy Shore,” – 2. “The Snow Song,” – 3. “May and September,” – 4. “Spell Song,” – 5. “Dance of Spirits,” – 6. “Battle Dirge.”

Mark

1904

Cecil Mark (1883-1944), In a Birch Canoe.  Words by William J. Accooe.  Published New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1904.

Recker

1904

Robert Recker, The Whistling Squaw. Characteristic March and Two-Step.  For piano solo.

Schuch

1904

Louis Arden Schuch (composer, lyricist, arranger), Mineola, or, The Wedding of the Indian and the Coon. A Characteristic Indian Serenade. Published Auburn, N.Y.: Schuch and Stevens Music Publishers, 1904.

Schuch

1904

Louis Arden Schuch, Idaho (“Indian Love Song”).  Lyrics by the composer.  Dedicated to “The Auburn Cyclers.” Published Auburn, N.Y.: Schuch Stevens Music Publisher, 1904. First Line of Chorus: “Ida Ida my Idaho, Wahoo loves you dearly a heap much so.”

Tighe

1904

Harry L. Tighe, Nola. [An Indian love song.] Words by Fred Wayne.  New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1904.

Tilzer

1904

Harry von Tilzer, My Kickapoo. Indian characteristic & Two-Step.  For piano solo. “My pretty little Kickapoo.” New York: Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., 1904.  Also published as a song with words by Andrew B. Sterling.

Troyer

1904

Carlos Troyer,  “Traditional Songs of the ZuĖis.” For voice and piano. 1st series (4 songs) in the Wa-Wan Press, vol. 3, no.19, 2nd series (2 songs) in vol. 3, no. 23; songs published with English and ZuĖi texts. Also published Philadelphia: T. Presser between 1904 and 1914.


CONTENTS:  (1st series) “Zunian Lullaby and Incantation,” “The Lover’s Wooing” (or “Blanket Song”), “The Sunrise Call,” and “The Coming of Montezuma”

(2nd series) “The Festive Sun Dance of the ZuĖis,” “The Great Rain Dance of the ZuĖis.”

Troyer

1904

Carlos Troyer, “Ghost Dance of the ZuĖis.” For Piano solo. Published 1904, Wa-Wan Press, vol. 3, no. 20.  Reprinted in John Gillespie, Nineteenth-Century American Piano Music (New York: Dover, 1978).

Van Alstyne

1904

Egbert Van Alstyne, Seminole. March, Two-Step.  For piano solo. Also published as a vocal: Seminole (“The New Indian Song by the Writers of Navajo”).  Lyrics by Harry Williams. Published New York: Shapiro, Remick & Co., 1904. 

Van Alstyne

1904

Egbert Van Alstyne, Tippecanoe. “A Comic Indian Song.”  Lyrics by Harry Williams.  New York: Shapiro, Remick, and Co., 1904.

Bock

1905

William E. Bock, My Rosebud Sioux. [Song.] Words by Ed. F. Cogley Published New York: M. Witmark & Sons., 1905.

Bryan

1905

Vincent Bryan and Leo Edwards (words and music), Pocahontas, etc. [Song.] Published New York: Gus Edwards Music Pub. Co., 1905.

Bryan

1905

V. Bryan and L. Edwards (words and music), Sioux Sue.  Song for voice and piano.

Brymn

1905

James Tim Brymn, Powhatanna. Words by Billy Johnson.

Burt

1905

Benjamin Hapgood Burt, Little Red Papoose. [Song.] Published New York: Jos. W. Stern & Co., 1905.

Busch

1905

Carl Busch (1862-1943), Five Movements from an Indian Suite: “Welcome to Hiawatha,” “Chibiabos,” “Funeral Procession of the Omahas,” 1st version of the “Omaha Indian Love Song” (presumed lost), and “Variations and Fugue on an Omaha Indian Theme.” [mss. remain for 4 of these.]

•“Beautiful is the Sun, O Strangers” (from canto 24 of Longfellow’s Hiawatha), 1905, but later published in Eight Indian Songs as “Greetings of Hiawatha” (see 1907)

• “Welcome to Hiawatha” for string orchestra (dated ca. 1905 by Donald Lowe, Carl Busch.)

Coleridge-Taylor

1905

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Three Song Poems.  Words by T. Moore Departure. 


CONTENTS: 1. Dreaming for ever -- 2. The young Indian Maid -- 3. Beauty and Song.
 

Curtis

1905

Natalie Curtis (1875-1921), Songs of Ancient America: “Three Pueblo Indian corn-grinding songs.” For voice and piano. Published New York: G. Schirmer, 1905. Indian lyrics, the first and third translated.  [Score includes a 3-page ethnological discussion of Indian corn-grinding songs from Laguna, New Mexico.] [M 1669 .C12F and 1609. B96S] 

•Also “American Indian Dances” (no info). 

•Also American Indian Dance Pageant (copyright, 1921; in ms. at the LC).  See excerpt “Deer Dance.”

•Also Victory Song: Words and music based on part of an original ceremonial Indian melody of the Pawnee Indians. For chorus and mixed voices. Published: Schirmer.

Davis

1905

Collin Davis, My Campfire Maid. An Indian love song. New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1905.

Edwards

1905

Gus Edwards (1879-1945), Tammany: March and Two-Step. Also published as a vocal: Tammany. A Pale Face Pow-Wow.  Words by Vincent Bryan. Published New York: M. Witmark & Sons, 1905.  First Line: “Hiawatha was an Indian, so was Navajo.” First Line of Chorus: “Tammany, Tammany, Big chief sits in his tepee.”

Ephraim

1905

Ellis R. Ephraim, Injun Gal.  “Novelty Indian Song.”  Words by P. C. Mason. Published New York: M. Witmark & Sons, 1905.

Farwell

1905

Arthur Farwell, From Mesa and Plain: Indian, Cowboy, and Negro Sketches (5 pieces for piano, Wa-Wan Press, vol. 4, no. 28, 1905).


CONTENTS: 1. “Navajo War Dance,” -- 2. “Pawnee Horses,” -- 3. “Prairie Miniature,” -- 4. “Wa-Wan Choral,” – 5. “Plantation Melody”

Farwell

1905

Arthur Farwell, Impressions of the Wa-Wan Ceremony of the Omahas, op. 21 (piano, Wa-Wan Press, vol. 5, no. 33, 1905). 


CONTENTS: 1. “Receiving the Messenger,” -- 2. “Nearing the Village,” -- 3. “Song of Approach,” -- 4. “Laying Down the Pipes,” -- 5. “Raising the Pipes,” -- 6. “Invocation,” -- 7. “Song of Peace,” -- 8. “Choral.”

Gray

1905

Katherin Gray, Sagawana. A Wigwam Episode.  For piano solo. Gray. Katherine 1905

Grey

1905

Vivian Grey (Miss Mabel McKinley), Feather Queen: An Indian Song; published: Leo Feist, New York.

Hoschna

1905

Karl L. Hoschna, Indian Dance.  For piano solo. New York:  M. Witmark & Sons, 1905.

Keiser

1905

Robert A. Keiser, The Squaw Man. Indian Intermezzo. For piano solo. Published New York: Leo Feist., 1905.

Kenny

1905

Ralph E. Kenny, Nakomis.  Indian two-step.  For piano.  [copy at BL]

Loring

1905

Loring, Harold A. (1879-?). Piano pieces and songs composed for his lectures beginning in 1905.

Mackinley

1905

Mabel Mackinley, Feather Queen. Indian Intermezzo. March two-step. Also published as a vocal: Feather Queen. An Indian song.

Moho-Nali.

1905

Moho-Nali.  Wahoo! Indian Dance.  For piano solo.  New York: Century Music Publishing, 1905.

Moret

1905

Neil Moret, Silver Heels (“Melody taken from the popular Indian Intermezzo”).  Lyrics: by James O’Dea. Published by Jerome H. Remick, New York.

Moret

1905

Neil Moret, Silverheels (“Indian Intermezzo—Two-Step”).  Piano solo.  Published by Jerome H. Remick, New York. Repr. 1906.

Pabst

1905

Henry Pabst, Greenwood. An Indian suite.  For piano solo.


CONTENTS: 1. Wiota. Wildwood dance -- 2. Oconto Ripple -- 3. Spirit Falls -- 4. Poysippi.
   [These are all names of towns in Iowa and Wisconsin.]

Petre

1905

Torsten Petre, An Indian Night in Twelve Sketches for the Pianoforte.

CONTENTS: 1. The Swallows -- 2. Intermezzo -- 3. Fantasia -- 4. An Indian Night -- 5. In the Spring -- 6. Rain and Sunshine -- 7. Thoughts and Memories -- 8. Imps' Revels -- 9. Scherzo -- 10. Wedding March -- 11. Grandmother's Song. -- 12. Sadness and Joy

Powell

1905

W. C. Powell, My Indian Summer Moon. [Song.] Words by James O'Dea.  Detroit: Jerome H. Remick, 1905.

Schwartz

1905

Jean Schwartz, My Irish Indian. [Song.] Words by William Jerome. New York; Shapiro, Remick, and Co., 1905.

Strelezki

1905

Anton Strelezki (pseud.), Minnehaha. - Laughing Water. - Dance Sketch for the Pianoforte. Published London: E. Ashdown., 1905.

Van Alstyne

1905

Egbert Van Alstyne, Sioux.  Song for voice and piano. Published Detroit, New York: Jerome H. Remick & Co., 1905. 

Williams

1905

Herbert Williams, Iroquois (“Characteristic March & Two-Step”); Instrumental. Published: Irving Music, New York.

Wilson

1905

Charles Jerome Wilson, Indian Lover's Serenade. Intermezzo. For piano solo.

Zimmerman

1905

Charles Zimmerman, Sitting Bull.  Words by Vincent Bryan.  Published New York: Vincent Bryan Music Co., 1905. First line of chorus: “Sitting Bull, old Sitting Bull, he was no fool.” First line of verse: “Mary Cow an Indian maiden, married Standing Steer.”

Friedman

1905

Leo Friedman, The Sun Dance: Indian Characteristic. Published New York: Sol Bloom, n.d.

Adams

1906

Mrs. Crosby Adams, Four Lullabies for Voice and Piano. Op. 16.   Words by A. H. Woodruff. Published Chicago: Clayton F. Summy, 1906.

CONTENTS: 1. Love's Lullaby -- 2. Indian Lullaby. Words by E.H. Kinney -- 3. Hush-a-bye Song -- 4. Slumber Song.

Avery

1906

Stanley Avery (1879-1967), “Eskimo Love Song” For voice and piano. Wa-Wan Press, vol. 5, no. 33.

Beach

1906

Amy Marcy Cheney Beach, Eskimos, Op. 64. For piano. Published Arthur P. Schmidt, 1907; rev. ed., 1943.  Four characteristic pieces based on Eskimo themes. Acc. to Block, all four are “based on tunes found in Franz Boas’s monograph, The Central Eskimo” (1888). 


CONTENTS: 1. “Artic Night” – 2. “The Returning Hunter” – 3. “Exiles” – 4. “With Dog-teams.”

Beaudry

1906

Wilfrid Beaudry, Nouhika. Indian Intermezzo Two-Step. For piano solo. 

Bendix

1906

Theodore Bendix, Nat-u-ritch. An Indian Idyll. Intermezzo from "The Squaw Man." For piano solo. Published New York: Jos. W. Stern & Co., 1906.  [Manuscript piano score and parts in the Belasco Collection, NYPL.]

Bliss

1906

 [Philip] Paul Bliss [Jr.] (1872-1933), “The Red Man’s Death Chant” For men’s chorus. Published 1906.

Brown

1906

Arthur L. Brown, “The Pixies in the Indian Village,” no. 3 in The Pixies' Carnival for Pianoforte Solo, Op. 32.

CONTENTS.--1. The Pixies' Waltz Song -- 2. The Pixies' Prize Song -- 3. The Pixies in the Indian Village -- 4. The Melancholy Pixie -- 5. The Pixies' Ballet -- 6. The Pixies in the Menagerie -- 7. The Pixies on the Midway -- 8. The Pixies on the giant Swing -- 9. The Pixies' Gavotte -- 10. The Pixies' Good-night Song

Claypoole

1906

Ed. B. Claypoole, My Prairie Wildflower Sioux. Indian Song.  Lyrics by Robert G. Claypoole. Published Baltimore: Monumental Publishing Co., 2123 Cromwell St., 1906.

Delmar

1906

Bert H. Delmar, "Iona, My Indian Star.” Song.  Words by the composer.  London: W. Paxton, Price and Reynolds, 1906.

Dulmage

1906

Will E. Dulmage, Strongheart.  Intermezzo - Two-Step for piano.  Published Cleveland: Sam Fox, 1906.

Edwards

1906

Leo Edwards, Cherokee. For piano solo. Published New York: Gus Edwards Music Pub. Co., 1906.

Hein

1906

Silvio Hein, Pawnee. Song. Published New York: Shapiro Music Publisher, Cor. Broadway & Thirty Ninth Street, 1906.

Johnson

1906

Charles L. Johnson, Lola. Lyrics by James O’Dea. Published New York: Jerome H. Remick, 1906.

Jones

1906

Ella Disbrow Jones, Ella Disbrow.  Paxinosa. Indian song. 1906.

Kain

1906

Harry C. Kain, Indian Summer Waltzes.  For piano solo. Published by Kain. C. Harry, 1906

Kämpf

1906

Karl Kämpf, Hiawatha Suite, “nach der gleichnamigen epischen Dichtung von Longfellow, für großes Orchester, Op. 27.” Published Berlin, 1906.


CONTENTS: 1. “Minnehaha (Laughing Water)” -- 2. “Hiawatha’s Complaint” -- [sic
, “Klage”] -- 3. “Beggar’s Dance” -- 4. “Chibiabos the Singer.”

Kellogg

1906

Arthur F. Kellogg, Indian Summer. Moment musicale for the pianoforte.

Kidner

1906

Walter James Kidner, An Indian Lullaby, words by A. K.-L. Dickson. A Quartett for male voices.

Lloyd

1906

Evans Lloyd, You're an Indian.  [Song.] Lyrics by Jeff T. Branen.

Morse

1906

Theodore F. Morse (1873-1924), Arrah Wanna.  “An Irish-Indian Intermezzo.”  For piano solo. Published New York: F.B. Haviland Publ. Co., New Zealand Building, Broadway & 37th St., 1906.

Morse

1906

Theodore F. Morse, Arrah Wanna: An Irish Indian Matrimonial Venture (song).  [“Arrah Wanna, on my honor, I'll take care of you”]  Lyrics by Jack Drislane. Published New York: F. B. Haviland, 1906 and London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1906.

Peel

1906

Gerald Graham Peel, Little Indian! Song, the words by R. L. Stevenson.

Robson

1906

T. F. Robson, The Indian. Written and composed by T. F. Robson & W. Hyde.

Rossiter

1906

Will Rossiter (1867-1954), Napanee: “a song founded on actual facts.” Published Chicago: Will Rossiter, 1906

Sawyer

1906

Henry S. Sawyer, Os-ka-loo-sa-loo. Characteristic Indian march & two-step.  For piano solo. Also published as a vocal: Os-ka-loo-sa-loo; Indian Love Song [“Oskaloosaloo, if I could do so, Loo”]. Lyrics by Jeff T. Branen. Published Chicago: Albright Music Co., 1906.

Skilling

1906

Robert P. Skilling, Reindeer: Indian-Eskimo song.  Lyrics by James O’Dea (1871-1914). Published Chicago: Victor Kremer Co., 1906.

Stedman

1906

Stedman and Stedman, Tommy Tomahawk (“A Wigwam Courtship”); Published Boston, Vinton Music.

Sullivan

1906

Sullivan, Dan J. (1875-1948).  Miss Pocahontas, “An Indian War-Whoop in two Whoops.”  Comic opera. Book by R. A. Barnet and R. M. Baker.  Additional musical numbers by H. H. Luther and C. Wilmore. Published Boston: White-Smith, 1906. 

Vogt

1906

Augustus Stephen Vogt, An Indian Lullaby. Part-Song for women's voices, etc.

Allen

1907

Paul Hastings Allen (1883-1952), The Lament of Indian Women, for voice and piano with English text, 4 p.  (privately published)

Burt

1907

Benjamin Hapgood Burt, Rain-In-the-Face: Comic Song. Published New York: Jerome H. Remick.

Busch

1907

Carl Busch, Eight Indian Songs from the "Hiawatha" of H. W. Longfellow, with German text by H. Simon. New York: Ditson, 1907. Each song published separately. [Published as “Six Indian Songs” in some sources.]


CONTENTS: 1. Gitche Manito the mighty. [Kitschi Manito der Mächt’ge] -- 2. Greeting of Hiawatha. [Gruss von Hiawatha] -- 3. When the noiseless Night descended. [Nachts, wenn alles liegt in Schweigen] -- 4. Chibiabos. [Tschibiabos] -- 5. Death of Chibiabos. [Tod der Tschibiabos] -- 6. Onaway! awake, Beloved. [Onaway! wach' auf, Geliebte!] -- 7. Hiawatha's friends. [Hiawatha's Freunde] -- 8. Farewell Minnehaha. [Leb'wohl! Minnehaha]. 

Busch

1907

Carl Busch, The Four Winds. - "Die vier Winde." - From the Song of Hiawatha [by H. W. Longfellow] set to music for Soprano and Tenor Soli, Chorus and Orchestra. The German translation by H. Simon. [Vocal Score.].

Busch

1907

Carl Busch, Indian Legend. For violin & piano. Published Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1907, 9 pp.  Dedicated to Arthur Hartmann. [Sibley M221.B97I]

Busch

1907

Carl Busch, The Four Winds. Cantata “using original Indian airs.” Published New York: H.W. Gray, 1907. Based on the Longfellow text for the 2nd canto of Hiawatha.

Cadman

1907

Charles Wakefield Cadman, An Indian Camp. No. 7 in A Visit to Grandma's.  For the Piano. Op. 34.  Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1907.

Cadman

1907

Charles Wakefield Cadman, The Rose of Cherokee. Song, words by J. Miller. Op. 24. No. 3. Published Philadelphia: T. Presser, 1907.

Collins

1907

Charles Collins, "My Wigwam just holds two." Written by Dave Hall and C. Collins.

Corin

1907

Joel P. Corin, “My Indian Squaw,” no. 3 from Two Islands. Lyrics by Felix F. Feist. Published New York: Leo Feist, 1907.


CONTENTS: 1. Kaaterina -- 2. Percy – 3. My Indian Squaw – 4. Simple Mary – 5. Just for the Sake of the Days gone by – 6. Sen~ora (Spanish song) – 7. Aren't you the Girl I met at Sherry's? – 8. My sunny Sunbeam – 9. Bathing – 10. I'm so demure – 11. Moony Time.

Eggeling

1907

Georg Eggeling, Fang-Ball. - The Indian Juggler. - Charakterstück für Pianoforte. Op. 137.  Boston: A. P. Schmidt, 1907.

Farwell

1907

Arthur Farwell, Owasco Memories, op. 8 (5 pieces for piano, Wa-Wan Press, vo. 6, no. 50, 1907).

Fitzgibbon

1907

Bert Fitzgibbon, “My Yankee Doodle Indian Boy.” [Song.] Words by Edgar Selden. New York: Maurice Shapiro, 1907.

Frain

1907

Theo. M. Frain, Saginaw the Tittabawassee Squaw. [Song.] Words by Leontine. Published New York: Frain Publishing Co., 1907.

Furth

1907

J. Seymour Furth, My Pocahontas for voice and piano (song “Introduced in Ziegfeld’s Review Follies of 1907 at the Jardin de Paris”). Lyrics by Edgar Selden. Published New York: Maurice Shapiro Music, 1907.

Haines

1907

Will E. Haines, Minnehaha. (A Redskin romance.).  Voice and piano.  Words by Albert Bagley.  London: Reeder & Walsh [1907].  [copy at BL]

Heyser

1907

E. K, Heyser, Pocahontas. [Song.] Words by Jack Roberts. Published New York: Modern Music Pub. Co., 1907.

Jackson

1907

Frederick W. Jackson, The Genius of Ka—Noo—No (“March-Two-Step”); Dedicated to the “Mystique Krewe of Ka—Moo—No.” Instrumental. Published Syracuse, New York: F. W. Jackson.  

Mills

1907

Kerry Mills, Red Wing. An Indian Intermezzo. For piano solo. Also published as a vocal: Red Wing (“An Indian Fable,” also “Famous Indian Song”). Lyrics by Thruland Chattaway. Published New York: Paull-Pioneer, 1907.

Moret

1907

Neil Moret, Morning Star (song); Lyrics by James O’Dea.  New York: Jerome H. Remick, 1907.

Morgan

1907

Robert Orlando Morgan, An Indian Night. Song, words by R. Douglas, etc. (Op. 40. No. 1.). [copy at BL]

Nevin

1907

Arthur Finley Nevin (1871-1943), Poia. Opera in three acts. Published Berlin: Fürstner, 1909. Libretto by Randolph Hartley (1870-1931), founded on legends collected by Walter McClintock. First complete concert performance, Carnegie Hall, Pittsburgh, January 16, 1907.  Excerpts also performed “as an illustrated lecture” with piano at the White House for President Theodore Roosevelt on April 23, 1907.

• “Indian Lullaby.” Published Boston: White-Smith Co., n.d.  [Nevin was taken to a Blackfeet Reservation in Montana by his friend Walter McClintock (an adopted member of the Blackfeet tribe) in June, 1903 to notate Indian melodies.]

Porter

1907

F. A. Porter, Pocahontas (“March and Two-Step”); published privately by the author.

Raynes

1907

J. A. Raynes, Big Chief Smoke: Uoof, Uoof, Uoof. Song for voice and piano. Lyrics by C. William Colb. Published New York: M. Witmark, 1907.

Reed

1907

David Reed, “The Reed Bird. The Indian’s Bride.” Song Intermezzo Two-Step. New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1907.

Reeves

1907

Ernest Reeves, Hobomoko. An Indian Romance. Arranged by Adolf Lotter. [Orchestral parts.]

Roma

1907

Caro Roma, O-Wee-Nee. Indian Intermezzo.  For piano solo.

Troyer

1907

Carlos Troyer, Indian Fire Song (Uru kuru) - “Turning the Firestick.” - With English and Indian text, and a description of the manner of producing fire quickly by the manual drill. Transcribed by C. Troyer.

Troyer

1907

Carlos Troyer, Kiowa-Apache War Dance. For piano. Published 1907, Wa-Wan Press, vol. 6, no. 45. “Indian Fire Song: Uru Kuru” [Turning the Firestick] (voice and piano, 1907), Wa-Wan Press, vol. 6, no. 46; “Hymn to the Sun” (no date).

Valentine

1907

F. L. Valentine, Mozette. (Indian Maiden.) For piano solo.

Beresford

1908

Lorena Beresford, Indian Serenade, no. 1 of Two Songs for a high voice, with Piano accompaniment. Words by H. G. Spencer. Arranged for quartet of women’s voices in 1910.

Brewer

1908

John Hyatt Brewer, Indian-Summer Sketch - A Dream - for Organ

Castling

1908

Harry Castling, "I'd be happy in a Wigwam with you." Written and composed by H. Castling and F. Godfrey. Published London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.

Farwell

1908

Arthur Farwell, Three Indian Songs. For chorus. Published 1908.

Gastaldon

1908

Stanislao Gastaldon, Musica Proibita. Romance and Hobomoko. An Indian Romance. By E. Reeves. [Military band parts.]

Haase

1908

Oscar Haase, Arizona. Indian romance. [Song.] Lyric by Mary Morrison & Clifford J. Werner

Henry

1908

S. R. Henry and D. Onivas [sic, actually “Savino”], Indianola (“Instrumental novelty and Fox trot”). Published New York: Joseph W. Stern.

Johnson

1908

J. Rosamond Johnson, The Big Red Shawl.  Lyrics by Bob Cole.  Published New York: Joseph Stern, 1908.

Jones

1908

Henry W. Jones, Topeka (song); lyrics:  James O’Dea; published:  Jerome H. Remick, New York.

Kerr

1908

Harry David Kerr, In a Little Wigwam.  [Song.] Words and music by H. D. Kerr.

Kolar

1908

Kolar, Victor (1888-?), Hiawatha (subtitled “a Dance Oriental,” symphonic poem for orchestra). Dedicated to Emil Paur. First performed Pittsburgh Orchestra, 1908 (Jan 31 & Feb 1) under conductor’s [composer’s?] baton. Performed again New York Philharmonic under Damrosch, March 3, 1911.

Indian Scherzo (violin and orchestra, undated).

Mills

1908

Kerry Mills, Sun Bird.  “An Indian Intermezzo.”  For piano solo. Published New York: F.A. Mills, 32 West 29th Street, 1908. Also published as a vocal: Sun Bird (“An Indian Intermezzo”). For voice and piano. Lyrics by Thurland Chattaway. Published New York: F. A. Mills, 1908.

Mohr

1908

Halsey K. Mohr, Kanawa. An Indian romance. [Song.] Words by Edgar Leslie. New York: Gordon Music Publishing Co., 1908.

Morse

 

1908

Theodore F. Morse, Minnie-ha-ha Donohue: “an Irish Indian love affair.”  Lyrics by Jack Mahoney. Published New York: F.B. Haviland Pub. Co., 1908. First line: “Minnie-ha ha was an Indian maiden long ago.”  First line of chorus: “Minnie-ha ha Donohue I love you heap much too.”

Morse

1908

Theodore F. Morse, Smiling Star (“A Western Romance in Song”).  Lyrics by Jack Drislane. Published New York: F. B. Haviland, 1908.

Offenbach/Dubourg

1908

Jacques Offenbach, arr. Charles Dubourg, Valse Chaloupée (“The Apache’s Dance”). “Grand SuccŹs de la Revue du Moulin Rouge” sure des motifs de J. Offenbach créé e régleé par Max Dearly et Mistinguett’ dan La Revue du Moulin. Published Paris: Choudens, 1936.  [Copyrighted 1908]

Spaulding

1908

George L. Spaulding, The American Indian. Characteristic Dance.  For piano solo.  Philadelphia: T. Presser, 1908.

Wenrich

1908

Percy Wenrich, Rainbow. (An Indian Intermezzo.) For piano solo. Also published as a vocal:  Rainbow. Lyrics by Alfred Bryan. Published New York: Jerome H. Remick, 1908.

Worthington

1908

Amy Titus Worthington, Scenes on the Niagara. Lyric Pieces for the Pianoforte.  

CONTENTS: 1. Voices of the Deep -- 2. Indian Lullaby -- 3. Moonbeams.

Zita

1908

R. Anthony Zita, Sleepy Eye.  “Indian Intermezzo.” Published New York: Jos. W. Stern & Co., 102-104 W. 38th St., 1908.

Alford

1909

Harry L. Alford, Song bird (“Indian Intermezzo”).  For piano solo, 1909.  Also published as a vocal: Song Bird. Indian song. Words by Arthur Gillespie, 1909.

Bennett, T

1909

Theron C. Bennett, Lovelight. An Indian serenade. [Song. In C.] Words by C. P. McDonald. Also published Lovelight: Indian Intermezzo for piano solo.

Burton

1909

Frederick Russell Burton. Harmonizations of Ojibway tunes recomposed as “art songs” in American Primitive Music. For voice and piano. Published New York: Moffat, Yard, and Co., 1909.

Cadman

1909

Charles Wakefield Cadman, Four American Indian Songs, Op. 45 “founded upon Tribal Melodies.” For voice and piano. Published Boston: White-Smith, 1909. Includes “From the Land of the Sky-Blue Water,” made famous by operatic soprano Lillian Nordica. Poems by Nelle Richmond Eberhart.  Each song is preceded by the original melody as transcribed. No. 1, “From the Land,” is from an Omaha tribal melody collected by Alice C. Fletcher.  


CONTENTS: 1. “From the Land of the Sky-Blue Water” -- 2. “The white dawn in stealing,” (from an Iroquois Tribal melody collected by Theodore Baker) -- 3. “Far off I hear a lover’s flute,” (an Omaha Flageolet Love Call from Fletcher) -- 4. “The moon drops low” (ibid no. 1). 


Several reprintings followed [1913 copy at BL], mostly recently Miami Lakes, Florida: Masters Music Publications, 1989.  There were also several arrangements, even for organ (Clarence Eddy, White-Smith, 1912);

Daoma or Land of Misty Water (opera in three acts; two versions, both unperf.).  Libretto by Eberhart and based on a story by Francis La Flesche;

Cadman

1909

Charles Wakefield Cadman, “To a Vanishing Race” from Three Moods for Piano, op. 40 (piano, 1909) [Cadman wrote many other works based on Indian melodies and/or subject matter.  See also his symphonic fantasy--and later quintet--based on “To a Vanishing Race” (quartet publ. Cincinnati: John Church, 1916).  An unspecified “To a Vanishing Race” was perf. in Seattle in July, 1916.]

Clark

1909

Peter S. Clark, My Copper Colored Squaw. First Line: “Copper Colored Squaw Know You Who You Are.” Published St. Louis: Thiebes-Stierlin Music.

Coleridge-Taylor

1909

Samuel Coleridge Taylor, My Algonquin. Song for voice and piano on the poem by Longfellow. Published Philadelphia: Theodore Presser, 1909.

Edwards

1909

Ed. Edwards, Singing Bird (“Indian Intermezzo”). Instrumental. Published New York: Joseph Morris.

Ely

1909

Aug. C. Ely (after Jacques Offenbach, 1819-1880), L'amour de l'Apache; valse, motifs by J. Offenbach. "Apache dance" arranged & introduced by Mons. G. Molasso, the great mimic pantomimist & ballet master in his pantomime L'amour de l'Apache at the Moulin Rouge. Published New York: Joseph W. Stern, 1909.

Freeman

1909

Harry L. Freeman (1869-1954, African-American), The Tryst. Tragic one-act opera, New York, 1911; unpublished. [Supposedly involves an Indian princess (?).]

Friedman

1909

Leo Friedman, Blue Beads (“An Indian Legend”). Lyrics by Beth Slater Whitson. Dedicated to Miss Virginia Markel. Published Chicago: Frank Root.

Godfrey

1909

Percy Godfrey, Wanderjahre. No. 2. Op. 31. Album for Piano (Wickins' Pianoforte Literature. No. 596., 1909).

CONTENTS: 1. Zulu War Dance -- 2. Creole Love Song -- 3. Indian Barcarolle -- 4. Chinese Reverie

Hillman

1909

Dora Loucks Hillman, Guiding Star.  “An Indian Intermezzo,” for piano solo. Published Chicago: Miller Music, 1909. Also published as a vocal: Guiding Star. An Indian Story,” for voice and piano. Words by Russell Webb Hillman. Published Chicago: Miller Music, 1909.

Keane

1909

Sallie Keane, Little Papoose. [Song.] Words and music by S. Keane, etc.  Chicago: Swastika Music Publishers, 1909.

Longboat

1909

Henry Longboat, Red Man.  “Indian Reverie.  Intermezzo.”  N.p, 1909.   Later publication, New York: Lew. Feist, 1914.

Magbee

1909

A. D. Magbee, "Kiss-i-mee.” Indian love song Words by Ester Ruth Magbee. Pittsburgh: Magbee Music, 1909.

Marzo

1909

Eduardo Marzo, Indian Summer. Cantata for Three-Part Chorus of women's voices, Soprano and Alto Soli and Piano accompaniment with Flute obbligato. Poem by M. E. Lacey. Op. 116, etc Marzo. Eduardo 1909

Meny

1909

Ph. R. Meny, Susquehana. “Indian Intermezzo, Two-Step.” - Op. 27.  For piano solo.   London: Francis, Day, and Hunter, 1909.  Arranged for military band, 1912.

Meyer

1909

George W. Meyer, My Prairie Song Bird. Words by Jack Drislane. New York: F. B. Haviland, 1909.

Mills

1909

Kerry Mills, Lily of the Prairie (“An Indian Fable”). Song for voice and piano.  Lyrics by the composer. Published New York: F. A. Mills, 1909. 

Moore

1909

J. Warwick Moore, Wahketah. An Indian Romance. Two-Step. For piano solo. Published Moore. J. Warwick 1909

Moret

1909

Neil Moret, Indian Summer. - “A Tale of the Woods.”  For piano solo.  Also published as a vocal: Indian Summer.  Lyrics by Earle C. Jones. Reprinted 1911.

Morse

1909

Theodore F. Morse, Blue Feather (“Indian Love Song”). Lyrics by Jack Mahoney. Published New York: Theodore Morse Music, 1909.

Morse

1909

Theodore F. Morse, Wise old Indian. “A comical conglomeration.”  [Song.] Lyrics by Jack Mahoney. New York: Theodore Morse Music Co., 1909.

Murchison

1909

W. A. Murchison, Moonlight dear. Indian Intermezzo. Words & music by Murchison & Hodge. Montréal: Delmar Music, 1909.

Piantadosi

1909

Al Piantadosi, Big Chief Dynamite. Words by Jeff T. Branen. Published Chicago: Will Rossiter, The Chicago Publisher, 152 Lake St., 1909.

Pierson

1909

William T. Pierson, Go-won-go.. Indian song.. Words by Will A. Boyd.  New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1909.

Schmid

1909

Johann C. Schmid, Moon-Bird.  “An Indian Love Song.”  Lyrics:  J. F. Dempsey.  Published New York: Jerome H. Remick & Co., 1909.

Schmid

1909

Johann C. Schmid, Moon Bird. “Indian Intermezzo; Two-step.” For piano solo. Dempsey & Schmid. [Composed by J. C. Schmid and possibly arranged by James E. Dempsey.] Also published as a vocal: Moon-Bird (“An Indian love song”). Written by J. E. Dempsey. Published Schmid. Johann C 1909

Sloane

1909

Alfred Baldwin Sloane (1872-1926), Lo: A Musical Comedy.  Book and lyrics by O. Henry and Franklin Pierce Adams.  Published New York: Charles K. Harris, 1909.

CONTENTS: 1. Love is all that matters -- 2. You may always be my sweetheart -- 3. Little old Main Street -- 4. In Yucatan -- 5. It's the little things that count -- 6. Statue song -- 7. Snap shots -- 8. Dear yankee maid -- 9. Let us sing -- 10. Never forget your parents -- 11. While strolling through the forest -- 12. Caramba -- 13. Sailor number 14. Tammany on parade. 

Snyder

1909

Ted Snyder (1881-1965), Ogalalla (“Indian Love Call”). Song. Lyrics by Vincent Bryan. Published New York: Ted Snyder Music Publishers.  [On sheet music cover:  “As featured by Mabel Hite and Mike Donlin”]

Stover

1909

Leroy Stover, Red Fern. Lyrics by Eddie Eckels. Published Chicago: The House of Christopher [Harold Rossiter].  [“As sung by Charles Ledegar and his Nine Red Path Napanees.”]

Van Alstyne

1909

Egbert Van Alstyne, Golden Arrow [“My little Golden Arrow I Love You”].  Song for voice and piano. Lyrics by Harry Williams. Published New York: Jerome H. Remick., 1909.

Williams

1909

W. R. Williams, Pretty Little Maid of Cherokee (“I’d Like to Join Your Family”). Published Chicago: Will Rossiter.

Ashleigh

1910

Glenn Wright Ashleigh, The Indian Maiden. [Song.] Words by Frederick Hamilton Green.

Beresford

1910

Lorena Beresford (words and music), An Indian Lover's Song. Song for a low voice with Piano accompaniment.

Bestor

1910

Donald Bestor (1889-1970), That Indian rag: the tom-tom song.  Words by Marvin Lee. Published Chicago: Will Rossiter, The Chicago Publisher, 1910.

Browne

1910

John Lewis Browne, Indian Dance for piano. Arranged by E. J. Biedermann for Two-Part Female Chorus. Words by Mrs. G. Federlein. Published New York: J. Fischer & Bros., 1910.

Cadman

1910

Charles Wakefield Cadman, Indian Summer.   For voice and piano.  Words by Nelle R. Eberhart.

De Costa

1910

Harry De Costa, Squaw Colleen. [Song.] Words by Joe McCarthy. Published New York: Head Music Pub. Co., 1910.

Erdman

1910

Ernie Erdman (1879-1946), Starlight Sioux. An Indian Idyll. Words by Aubrey Stauffer. Published Chicago: Aubrey Stauffer & Co., 1910.

Finzel

1910

George H. Finzel (words and music), Big Chief Penobscot. Published Detroit: Jerome H. Remick & Co., 1910.  First line of chorus: “My little paleface won't you marry me?”

Hager

1910

Frederick W. Hager, My Ramapoo: an Indian love song. Published New York: The Jos. Morris Co., 1910.  First line of chorus: “My Ramapoo, my heart I bring to you.”

Jewitt

1910

Jessie Mae Jewitt, Cradle Songs of Many Nations. [Words] By G. Graff. Jr. and [music by] J. M. Jewitt.  New York: M. Witmark & Sons, 1910.
 

CONTENTS: 1. Baby of the Lagoon – 2. Venetian Lullaby – 3. Bye-lo-Land – 4. Mother's Lullaby – 5. Little Chief of seven Moons – 6. Indian Lullaby – 7. Little Fur Baby  -- 8. Northern Lullaby – 9. Little Maid of Tokio – 10. Japanese Lullaby – 11. My Little Pickaninny – 12. Darkey Lullaby – 13. My wee bonnie Bairnie – 14. Scottish Lullaby – 15. Sleep little Angel -- 16. Lullaby

Lawrance

1910

Alfred J. Lawrance, In the Land of the Sioux.. (My sweet Cherokee!) [Song.]. Written by George Arthurs. Published London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

Lyle

1910

Thomas J. Lyle. “Papoose. Indian Intermezzo.” New York: Jerome H. Remick and Co., 1910.

McClintock

1910

Walter McClintock, The Old North Trail; or Life, Legends and Religion of the Blackfeet Indians. (Appendix i. Blackfeet Indian Songs. [Melodies only.])

Meyer

1910

George W. Meyer, “Wandalola.” Indian Intermezzo. New York: F. B. Haviland Co., 1910.

Miller

1910

Horace Alden Miller (1872-1941), Melodic Views of Indian Life for piano. Published Chicago: Clayton F. Summy, 1910, 19 pp..  Harmonization and adaptation of American Indian Melodies.  Dedicated to Theodora Sturkow Ryder. Note on the cover: Melodies of the Paiute, Arapaho, Ojibwa, Caddo, Kiowa.  “All themes taken from the U.S. Bureau of Ethnology Reports.” 


CONTENTS: 1. “Gambling Song (Paiute),” -- 2. “The Song of the Great Spirit (Arapaho),” -- 3. “Hentanewa (Ojibwa),” -- 4. “Father Have Pity (Arapaho),” -- 5. “The Reveille (Caddo),” -- 6. “The Midewiwin (Ojibwa),” -- 7. “Ceremonial Song (Ojibwa),” -- 8. “Ghost Dance (Kiowa),” -- 9. “The Seven Venerable Priests (Arapaho).” 

•Other undated published works based on Indian themes:  “Indian Song,” or “The Sun Friend” (based on a Sioux melody) for women’s chorus. Published Boston: Arthur P. Schmid.

Miller

1910

Horace Alden Miller, Suite Amerindian in four movements for organ. Published Altadena, California: Cornell Music Publ. Co.. 


CONTENTS: 1. “Song of Farewell” – 2. “The Powwow,” – 3. “Theme and Variations,” – 4. “Indian Dance and Warrior’s Song.”

Penso

1910

Ralph Penso, Indian maid.. (Till that bright moon shall cease from shining). Written by Worton David.

Puccini

1910

Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924). La Fanciulla del West. Opera. First performed Metropolitan Opera, December, 1910. [Contains two Indian characters.  Acc. to Howard, when Puccini began to write his opera, he sent for Farwell’s Wa-Wan Press publications, and from them took themes to give his opera local coloring. “The miner’s song from the first act is a ZuĖi Sunrise Call” from Troyer.]

Santley

1910

Joseph H. Santley, My moonbeam… An Indian serenade. Words by Ren. Shields.

Schenck

1910

Elliott Schenck (1868-1939). Indian Overture: “The Arrow Maker,” from the incidental music for orchestra to the play of the same name by Mary Austen (unpublished, probably composed 1910). Score calls for large orchestra, tom-toms and rattles. First performed by the New Theatre Orchestra, New York, 1910, the composer conducting. [Score and performance information in the Fleisher Music Collection.]

Severn

1910

Edmund Severn, “A Wild Indian,” no. 1 from In Picture Land. A Suite of descriptive Solos for young players for Violin and Piano. 


CONTENTS: 1. A Wild Indian – 2. The Blacksmith – 3. The Dancing Master -- 4. The Gipsy Prince -- 5. Captain Brown.

Snyder

1910

Ted Snyder, O-ga-lal-la: Indian Intermezzo, Two-Step. Published New York: Ted Snyder Co., 1910

Sousa

1910

John Philip Sousa,  “The Red Man.”  The 1st movement of a three-movement suite, The Dwellers in the Western World. Piano arrangement--1st and 3rd movements only. Published Church Music Publ., 1910. Arranged for band--complete suite, 1911; orchestra, 1916.  Published in piano arr., March and Dance Album, Vol. 3. Published Cincinnati: John Church, 1914.  [2nd movement is “The White Man,” 3rd movement is “The Black Man.”]

Tonning

1910

Gerard Tonning (1860-1940), Leif Ericsson. Opera, Seattle; unpublished)  [Part of the story involves an Indian princess.]  [Mss. at Univ. of Washington, Seattle}

Wenrich

1910

Percy Wenrich, Silver Bell.  Words by Edward Madden. Published New York: Jerome H. Remick & Co., 1910.

Weston

1910

Harry Weston, Tee-na-nah: Indian rag. Published New Orleans: L. Grunewald, 1910

Wilson

1910

Anne Campbell Wilson, Five Indian Songs. Collected by A. C. Macleod. Accompaniments by L. Bridges.


CONTENTS: 1. Come, Beloved -- 2. Song of the deserted Wife -- 3. Tell me, Mistress – 4. The Leaf fell from the Tree – 5. Song of Hir. Wilson.

Bond

1910

Rollin Bond, Sacajawea: Indian Intermezzo. "Special arrangement for Sousa's Band."  Sacajawea Statue Association label affixed to title page of conductor's part.

Ayres

1910s

Frederic Henry (1876-1926), “The West Wind and the Daughter of Nokomis.” “Legend” for piano, undated; 11 pp.; a musical setting of a canto of Longfellow’s Hiawatha. [LC, acquired 1927; has most of Ayres collection. [Farwell writes, 1912 (“Indian and Negro”), that Ayres uses the “Indian idiom,” particularly in two fugues for piano. He says Ayres “is among those who feel that the Indian influence has made a permanent entrance into American music.”]

Aletter

1911

Wilhelm Aletter, Natoya. An Indian Intermezzo.  For piano solo.  1911

Bergen

1911

Alfred Hiles Bergen, The Song of the Birch. An Indian Song Cycle, etc. Poem by L. Dickinson.  Chicago: Gamble Hinged Music Co., 1911.

Bréville

1911

Gaston de Bréville, The Song of the Indian Mother. A Lullaby, words by L. W. Mitchell.  London: Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew, 1911.

Bucalossi

1911

Brigata Bucalossi, An Indian Melody, in G minor, for the Pianoforte.  Published New York: Chappell, 1911.

Burke

1911

Joe Burke, Love Bird  [“My little love bird I hear you singing”]. Lyrics by Joseph T. Dempsey. Published Philadelphia: Welch and Wilsky, 1911.

Converse

1911

Converse, Frederick (1871-1940). The Sacrifice.  Opera. Performed Boston Opera House, 3 March 1911. Libretto by composer and John A. Macy after a story by Lt. Henry Augustus Wise.  [Mss. LC, acquired 1930.] [The Sacrifice is not really an “Indian opera” though it has one major Indian character, Tomassa, an old servant woman who sings an aria in Act I about her people.]

Dunning

1911

A. E. Dunning, The Old Indian Bungalow. Barn Dance. For piano solo. Cape Town, South Africa: Darter & Sons, 1911.

Fletcher

1911

Percy Eastman Fletcher, The Indian Bride. For womens’ voices (S.S.C.) with piano. Words by George Ellerton.  London: J. Curwen & Sons, 1911.

Geibel

1911

Adam Geibel, Indian Cradle Song. [For S.C.]  London: J. Curwen & Sons, 1911.

Gilbert

1911

Henry Franklin Belknap Gilbert (1866-1928), Indian Scenes.  Five Pieces for the Pianoforte.  Adapted from the incidental music to the “musicale” The Story of a Vanishing Race, an illustrated lecture by Edward S. Curtis. Published New York: H. W. Gray, 1912.  23 pp.  Includes introductory note and selected photographs used in Curtis’s lecture.  The music, according to Gilbert, is “based upon Indian motifs.”


CONTENTS: 1. “By the Arrow,” -- 2. “The Night Scout,” -- 3. “In the Kutenai Country,” -- 4. “Signal Fire to the Mountain God,” -- 5. “On the Jocko.”
 

[Several other movements were supposedly included in the musical score: “The Spirit of the Indian Life” (orchestral prelude), “Dream of the Ancient Red Man” (suite), “Evening in the Hopi Land,” etc.]

Herbert

1911

Victor Herbert (1859-1924), Natoma. Opera, Philadelphia, 1911. Published Schirmer, 1911). Libretto by Joseph Redding. [Ms. orchestral score on microfilm at LC].  Received Bispham Medal, 1925.  Herbert prepared a concert work entitled “Natoma, Act III Prelude,” an adaptation of excerpts from the third act and performed by several orchestras, eg. Chicago Symphony: Nov. 14-5, 1913 (“All American” concert).  The “Dagger Dance” from Act II was later arr. for men’s chorus.  See 1934, Deis.

Herbert/Langey

1911

Victor Herbert, “Grand Fantasia on the Opera” for orchestra. Published New York: Schirmer, 1911. Arranged by Otto Langey (1851, Germany-1922). This is a beautifully conceived tone poem faithfully constructed in sequential order from sections of the opera. This has been recorded by Donald Hunsberger and the East-Dryden Orchestra as well as the Slovak Radio Orchestra.  Langey also adapted “Two Pieces from Natoma” (Published Schirmer, 1917) for small orchestra.  They are 1) “Dagger Dance,” and 2) “Indian Invocation.”

Johnson

1911

Charles L. Johnson, Silver Star [“We will be dreaming by campfires gleaming”]. Lyrics by William R. Clay. Published Kansas City: J. W. Jenkins.

Johnson-Suerken

1911

Lena Johnson-Suerken, The Apache Sun Dance for piano. Published Los Angeles: Homer Jourjée, 1911.

Kaps

1911

Karl Kaps (pseud.), Rising Moon. Indian Intermezzo Two-Step for Pianoforte.  London: E. Ashdown, 1911.

Lehman

1911

Liza Lehman (1862-1918), Prairie Pictures. North American Indian.  Song Cycle for four voices with Pianoforte accompaniment. Words by the composer. Published New York: Chappell, 1911; 32 pp.

Lemon

1911

Laura G. Lemon, “Sleep, My Little Papoose” from Canadian Song Cycle, the words by A. Fleming.  ([No. 1.] A Song of the Prairie. [No. 2.] The Chipmunk. [No. 3.] In old Quebec. [No. 4.] Sleep, my little Papoose.). [copy at BL]

Livernash

1911

Will L. Livernash, Sparkling Eyes; lyrics by the composer; dedicated:  “To my dear friend Mrs. D. H. Cockerton, Oakland, California; published:  Joseph M. Daly, Boston, Mass.

Martini

1911

Ettore Martini, My Sunbeam Sioux. Words & music by Ettore Martini. New York: Joe Morris Music Co., 1911.

Moore

1911

Mary Carr Moore (1873-1957). Narcissa (publisher’s title), or The Cost of the Empire. Opera. Performed Seattle, 1911. Publlished New York: Witmark, 1912. Libretto by Sarah Pratt Carr.

Moret

1911

Neil Moret, Indian Summer.  Words by Earle C. Jones. Published New York: Jerome Remick, 1919.

Moritz

1911

Richard K. Moritz, Wan–A–Tea (“Indian Intermezzo” and “Two-Step”); Instrumental (“Revised and arranged for the piano by Walter Rolfe”); “Respectfully dedicated to Miss Florence Lawrence.” Published Rumford, Maine: Walter Rolfe Music, 1911.

Patton

1911

Willard Patton (1853-1924), Pocahontas. Opera. Concert performance: Minneapolis, January 4, 1911.

Paul

1911

John Paul, Indian Courtship.  New York: F.B. Haviland, 1911.

Plunkett

1911

Vincent C. Plunkett, Pretty little Rainbow… An Indian love song.. Words by Robert Levenson. Published New York: Joe Morris Music, 1911. Revised and republished in 1919.

Sparks

1911

Lyle Weaver Sparks, White Feather: “An Indian croon.” Published Kansas City, Mo.: Johnson Pub. Co., 1911. First line of chorus: “Leave tepee and come with me me, White Feather.”

Staunton

1911

Harry Staunton and Donovan Meher (words and music), My sweet I-o-way. [A Mexican Indian song.] London: Francis, Day, and Hunter, 1911.

Stewart

1911

Humphrey John Stewart, Indian Love Song. [Song.] Words by J. W. Shiels. Published New York: J. Fischer and Bro., 1911.

Stoye

1911

Paul Stoye, Indian Summer.  Op. 90.  For piano solo. A “simplified edition,” op. 90, no. 2, was published in 1913.

Watson

1911

Edward Watson, Five Characteristic Dances, composed for the Children's Pageant, Liverpool Coronation Festivities, June 1911. Op. 14. For piano solo.  Publ. Birkenhead: Weston and Co., 1911.


CONTENTS: 1. Gavotte -- 2. Japanese Dance -- 3. Minuet -- 4. Cossak -- 5. Indian Dance.

Wenrich

1911

Percy Wenrich, In Tepee Land; Lyrics by the composer. Published Chicago:  Frank K. Root, 1911.

Ayer

1912

Nath. D. Ayer, Indian Rag. [Song.] Words by A. Seymour Brown. New York: Jerome H. Remick, 1912.

Becker

1912

John J. Becker (1886-1961), Symphony No. 1 (Etude Primitive). For orchestra; four movements, Unpublished but distributed by New Music Edition. 1st movement, “An Indian Hymn,” and 3rd movement, “Deep Forests.” Performed by the Twin Cities Orchestra, Minneapolis, 1936.  [Manuscript in the Fleisher Music Collection.]

Bliss

1912

[Philip] Paul Bliss [Jr.], The Feast of the Red Corn. An “American Indian Operetta for Ladies.” Published Cincinnati: Willis, 1912.

Cadman

1912

Charles Wakefield Cadman, Idealized Indian Themes for piano solo, Op. 54. Published Boston: White-Smith, 1912.
 
CONTENTS: 1. “The Pleasant Moon of the Strawberries” (“founded on two Indian melodies”; dedicated to Arthur Farwell) -- 2. “From the Land of the Sky-Blue Water,” “transcribed from the celebrated song of the same name” (“founded upon an Omaha Indian Melody obtained by Alice C. Fletcher”; to Alice C. Fletcher) -- 3. “The Sadness of the Lodge” (“founded on an Omaha melody”; to Francis Hendriks) -- 4. “The Return of the Braves: Marche Fantastique” (“founded on two Omaha Indian War Songs”; to Dallmeyer-Russell).

Coleridge-Taylor

1912

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Hiawatha Ballet Music, Op. 82, no. 1, and Minnehaha Ballet Music, Op. 82, No. 2. Both ballets were unfinished at the time of the composer’s death (1912) and were “arranged and orchestrated” by Percy Fletcher. Suite: Hiawatha was published London: Hawkes and Son, 1920, and Suite: Minnehaha was published London: Hawkes and Son, 1925. 


Suite: Hiawatha
is in 5 sections. CONTENTS: 1. “The Wooing,” – 2. “The Marriage Feast,” -- 3. “Bird Scene and Conjurer’s Dance,” – 4. “The Daparture,” – 5. “Reunion.”  


Suite: Minnehaha
is in 4 parts.  CONTENTS: 1. “Laughing Water” -- 2. “The Pursuit” – 3. “Love Song,” – 4. “The Homecoming.”

Cowell

1912

Henry Cowell (1897-1965), “The Tides of Mananaun.” For piano solo. Published San Francisco, 1912. An experimental work that used tone clusters but also “an Indian theme.”

Farban

1912

Richard Farban, The Wigwam. Two-Step. For piano solo.  London: Ascherberg, Hopwood, and Crew, 1912.

Findlay

1912

A. Findlay, Indian Love Song. [Song.] Words by J. T. Littleton. Chicago: Gamble Hinged Music, 1912.

Glenville

1912

Frederick Glenville (words and music), The Indian Maid’s Love. London: E. Marks and Son, 1912.

Jones

1912

Sara E. Jones, Three Indian Love Songs.  Words by J. W. Morgan. London: Vincent Music, 1912.

CONTENTS: 1. Wunnerie -- 2. Thy Resting Place -- 3. Then lay me low.

Lawrance

1912

Alfred J. Lawrance, Hush-a-bye, my Little Papoose…(An Indian Cradle Song.). Words by Henry Carmen.

Lieurance

1912

Thurlow Lieurance (1878-1963), By the Waters of the Minnetonka (Moon Dear) for voice and piano. Poem by J. M. Cavaness. Published Philadelphia: Presser, 1914. For voice and piano, with violin or flute ad lib. Included in the 1950s Victor album Twelve Beloved American Songs, and more recently in the Dover collection St. Louis Blues and Other Hits of 1914, ed. Sandy Marrone. This appeared in several later editions.  It was published by Presser “dedicated to Mr. Alfred Williams” in 1917.  It was arranged as a vocal duet in 1919 (Indian Songs, No. 9). Also listed in Erno Rapee (1925) as a piece used for Indian scenes in silent film accompaniment.

Merrick

1912

Hope Merrick, Two Red-Indian Love Songs. Words from Longfellow's "Hiawatha”  London: Elkin and Co.,1912.

CONTENTS: 1.. Listen! 'tis my Voice you hear. 2. Though you were at a Distance.

Mullen

1912

William J. Mullen, Indian Summer Time. Words by George W. Sutton, Jr. Music by William J. Mullen. New York: Jerome H. Remick, 1912.

Murphy

1912

Louise Murphy, Little Papoose. Words by Cy Warman. Chicago: Clayton F. Summy, 1912.

Nassann

1912

William Nassann, Wahneka. “Indian Novelty Song and Intermezzo.” Lyrics by  J. Eugene Johnson. “Respectfully dedicated to Miss Bertha Marshall, Lewiston, Maine.” Published Waterbury, Connecticut:  Johnson and Nassann.

Sappington

1912

T. L. Sappington, Indian days, a musical comedy in one act.  Book and lyrics by the composer. Published Chicago, T.S. Denison & Company 1912.

Troyer

1912

Troyer, Carlos. “Sunset Song: Ceremonial Thanks Offering to the Sun.” For voice and piano. Published Presser, 1912. [As is common for many of Troyer’s “ZuĖi” pieces, he notes that in the original version, the song was accompanied “with a Drum & Flute-trumpet.”]

Whiteley

1912

Bessie M. Whiteley, Hiawatha’s Childhood. Operetta in 1 act for unchanged voices. Published C.C.Birchard & Co., 1914.  “Awarded the Prize by ’The National Federation of Music Clubs’ Competition‘ on Sept. 1, 1912, in the operetta class.”

Wilkes

1912

Robert W. Wilkes, Indian Dance.  For Pianoforte. Op. 7. Boston: B. F. Wood, 1912.

Braham

1913

John J. Braham, Music from Hiawatha, the Indian Passion Play in Four Parts after Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Musical score “arranged from Ojibway Indian music” and used for the film Hiawatha by F. E. Moore (4-reel version).  11 instrumental parts. 

Brown

1913

Albert William Brown, Strongheart. Words by Harold R. Atteridge.  New York: Shapiro, Bernstein, and Co., 1913.

Burleigh

1913

Cecil Burleigh, (1885-1980).  Five Indian Sketches for violin and piano, Op. 40 (New York: G. Schirmer, 1913).   Each of these was published separately as well.  Copies at LC and UAZ.

CONTENTS: 1. “Legend,” 2. “Over Laughing Waters,” 3. “To the Warriors,” 4. “From a Wigwam,” and 5. “Sun Dance.”  

Busch

1913

Carl Busch, Three Songs, with Piano accompaniment. Words from Hiawatha, by Longfellow. (German version by H. Simon.)  Each published separately.  New York: G. Schirmer, 1913. 


CONTENTS: 1. Give me of your Bark, O Birch-tree. Gieb mir deine Rinde, Birke – 2. Pau-Puk-Keewis' Beggar's Dance. Der Bettlertanz von Pau-Puk-Kih-wis – 3. Take your Bow, O Hiawatha. Nimm den Bogen, Hiawatha

Colburn

1913

George Colburn, The Mask of Montezuma.  [Publication information unknown.]

Cowell

1913

Henry Cowell, Savage Suite for piano. Very early set of 10 pieces (some imcomplete) written “to George Sterling.”  Some of the movement titles are: “Savage Dance,” “War Dance,” “Fire Dance,” “Funeral March of Natives,” and “Savage Rhythm.” Manuscript.

Faulds

1913

John Faulds, The Indian. Grand March.  For piano solo. London: E. Marks and Son, 1913.

Federoff

1913

H. Federoff, My Indian maid.. By H. Federoff… Lyric adapted by Everett J. Evans. See this song with different words, 1914.

Grunn

1913

[John] Homer Grunn (1880-1944), Desert Suite, Op. 7.  “Five tone pictures for the piano.” Published LA: Southern California Music Co., 1913. Reprint Cleveland: S. Fox, 1929, 25 pp.. Published with each of 5 movements preceded with a poem by William Cooper Howells and line drawings of Indians by W. E. Rollin. Later arr. for orchestra by Tobani and publ. by C. Fischer.


CONTENTS: 1. “At Sunrise,” -- 2. “On the Mesa,” -- 3. “Cholla Dance,” -- 4. “The Mirage,” -- 5. “Oasis.”


•“Hopi Indian Dance,” Op. 16 (orchestra, ms., n.d.)

Hanson

1913

William Frederick Hanson, (1887-1970s?). The Sun Dance (opera, “Religious ceremonial,” 1913, Vernal, Utah, “based on a Sioux Indian ceremony.”

Hanson

1913

William Frederick Hanson, Täm-Mänę-Näcupę Opera, 1913. Produced 1928 (q.v.).   [Score of The Sun Dance at the LC.]

Huntington

1913

Raymond Huntington, A Seminole Legend. A Group of four Songs for Contralto or Baritone, with Piano accompaniment, words by J. H. Orme.


CONTENTS: 1. In the Wigwam -- 2. 'Twere better to have burned -- 3. On the Lake --  4. Love hath won Woodman.

Kirkman

1913

Merle Kirkman, “Indian Cradle Song.” [Song.] The words by E. D. Barker. Chicago: Gamble Hinged Music Co., 1913.

Lieurance

1913

Thurlow Lieurance, [Nine] Indian Songs, “collected and arranged” by Lieurance. For voice and piano. Published Philadelphia: Presser, 1913.  Score contains a substantial 5-page introduction to the legends and contextual backgrounds to each of the nine songs.


CONTENTS: 1. “Lullaby,” -- 2. “Love Song (From the Red Willow Pueblos),” -- 3. “The Weaver (The Blanket--Her Rosary),” -- 4. “My Silver Throated Fawn (Sioux Love Song),” -- 5. “A Crow Maiden’s Prayer Song,” -- 6. “Aooah (Love Song from the Red Willow Pueblos),” -- 7. “Pakoble (The Rose),” -- 8. “Pa-Pup-Ooh (Deer Flower),” -- 9. “Her Blanket (From the Navajo).”
   [M1669 ,C124] 

Lindsay

1913

John Lindsay, Aisha: Indian Intermezzo. Published New York: Waterson, Berlin & Snyder, 1913.

Marzian

1913

A. F. Marzian, Tonawanda: an Indian characteristic. For voice and piano.  (Described as a “march.”). Published New Albany, IN: A.F.Marzian, Music Publisher, 1913.

Miller

1913

Horace Alden Miller, Two Ojibwa Songs. 1. “In the Linden Cradle,” and 2. “For the Golden Harvest.” Published Cincinnati: Willis, 1913.

Pryor

1913

Dague R. Pryor, “Silver Cloud.” Indian Intermezzo Two-Step. London: Charles Sheard & Co., 1913.

Schwabe

1913

Vera May Schwabe, Two Short Pieces for piano: 1. Idyl -- 2. An Indian Dance.  London: Opus Music, 1913.

Sinclair

1913

Jean Sinclair (words and music), My little Indian Maid.  London: Rossi and Spinelli, 1913.

Smith

1913

Clay Smith (1876-1930), Imogene. Indian Wild Flower. Reverie.  Published Oskaloosa, Iowa: C.L. Barnhouse, 1913.

Troyer

1913

Troyer, Carlos.  “Zunian Clown Dance (Kor-kok-shi).” Published Philadelphia: Presser, 1913.

Van Biene

1913

Auguste van Biene, Valse Apache, for violoncello with pianoforte accompaniment.

Violinsky

1913

Violinsky [sic] and Mike Bernard, Apache, Intermezzo. For piano solo.  Published New York: Waterson, Berlin, and Snyder, 1913.  New version in 1915 without “Intermezzo” in title.

Wenrich

1913

Percy Wenrich (1887-1952), Snow Deer.  Indian song.  Lyrics by Jack Mahoney. Published New York: Wenrich-Howard Co., 1913.

Zamecnik

1913

John S. Zamecnik (1872-1953), Indian music (generic) for silent films, included in the 2-volume publication “Sam Fox Moving Picture Music.” 


CONTENTS:  “Indian March,” “Indian Love Song,” “Indian War Dance,” “Indian Music.”  Volume 3 was published in 1914 and includes “Indian Attack”

Bartlett

1914

Homer Newton Bartlett, Little Indian, Sioux or Crow. Humorous Chorus for men's voices. [Words by] R. L. Stevenson. Op. 251 Bartlett.  New York: G. Schimer, 1914.

Burleigh

1914

Cecil Burleigh, Ghost Dance.  No. 3 of Four Small Concert Pieces for violin with piano accompaniment. Op. 21.  Published New York: G. Schirmer, 1914. 

Busch

1914

Carl Busch, Minnehaha’s Vision. Symphonic poem for orchestra. Title originally in German: “Minnehaha’s Traumbild”; inspired by Longfellow’s Hiawatha. Published Leipzig: Jost (Oliver Ditson, 1914) Reprinted: Sam Dennison, ed., American Orchestral Music, Vol. 11, [n.l.:] Hall, 1992).  First performed Kansas City under composer, 1916; also performed by the Minneapolis Symphony. [Score uses an “Indian drum.”]

Busoni

1914

Ferruccio Busoni (1866-1924), Indian Fantasy (Indianische Fantasie), for piano and orchestra. Published Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1915.   First performed in Berlin, 1914. First performance in the U.S. with Busoni under Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra on 19 February 1915. [Based on American-Indian melodies and rhythms supplied the composer by Natalie Curtis Burlin. (Conceived on one of the composer’s five sojourns in America, probably 1910, but finished in Berlin.]

CONTENTS:  1. “Fantasy,” -- 2. “Canzona,” -- 3. “Finale.”

Cadman

1914

Charles Wakefield Cadman, From Wigwam and Tepee, Op. 57. “Four American Indian Songs founded upon Tribal Melodies” for voice and piano. Published Boston: White-Smith, 1914. Lyrics by Nelle Richmond Eberhart.  (“Harmonized and elaborated by Cadman.”) 


CONTENTS: 1. “The Place of Breaking Light” (suggested by a theme in Burton’s American Primitive Music
) -- 2. “From the Long Room of the Sea” (from a Chippewa air recorded by Frances Densmore) -- 3. “Ho, Ye Warriors on the Warpath” (suggested by a Sioux theme sung by the Chippewas and recorded by Densmore) -- 4. “The Thunderbirds Come from the Cedars” (built on a theme recorded by Francis LaFlesche and Alice Fletcher.  [Each song preceded by a brief description of the context.]

Crosby

1914

Marie Crosby, Indian Love Song, for the pianoforte. Philadelphia: Theodore Press, 1914.

De Lamater

1914

Eugene De Lamater, “Indian Trail.” Intermezzo Two-Step. “Indian War Dance.” Chicago: M. L. Carlson & C., 1914.

Falknor

1914

E. Falknor, On the War-path. Indian March. For piano solo. London: Nightingale and Co., 1914.   Published for “light orchestra” London: Hawkes and Son, 1916.

Federoff

1914

H. Federoff, My Indian maid… Indian Intermezzo. (Moja indianka.) - Russian title]. Words [adapted] by Marion Raybould. See this song with different words, 1913.

Ferguson

1914

Austin Ferguson, Indian Wedding March.  For piano solo. London: West and Co., 1914.

Gilbert

1914

Henry F. Gilbert, “Indian Sketches.” For piano, 1914. Version for orchestra, 1921. [Sibley M25.C124I19] 

Hammer

1914

Heinrich Hammer,  “American Indian Rhapsody No. 1” for large orchestra. Published Boston Music Co., 1914. Work is subtitled “Sioux Indian Sun Dance” and is footnoted: “Melodies collected by Miss Frances Densmore and used with permission of The Smithsonian Institute, Wahington, D.C.”  Score indicates pantomimed instructions such as “Victory over the Sacred Pole, or “Opening Song of the Sun Dance.” 

Hanson

1914

William Frederick Hanson, The Bleeding Heart. Opera; libretto by E. L. Roberts; unproduced. Borroff in American Operas says perf. Provo, UT, 1937).

Holstein

1914

Hans von Holstein, Whippoorwill. Indian song. Words by Richard W. Pascoe.  Detroit: Oxford Music Publishing, 1914.

Keithley

1914

E. Clinton Keithley, Lost Arrow. An Indian romance. Song. By Keithley and Thompson.  Chicago: Frank K. Root and Co., 1914.

Kerrison

1914

Davenport Kerrison (b. 1843?), The Last of the Aztecs. Grand opera, unperformed.

Kolar

1914

Victor Kolar, “Americana: Symphonic Suite.” Published Schirmer, 1914.  Dedicated to W. Damrosch.

Lieurance

1914

Thurlow Lieurance, Indian Flute Call and Love Song.  “Recorded and harmonized” by Lieurance.  Philadelphia: Theodore Presser, 1914.

Lieurance

1914

Thurlow Lieurance, Indian Suite (piano, 2 pp., 1914); includes introductory program notes.   Philadelphia: Theodore Press, 1914.

Drama of the Yellowstone (opera on an Amer. Indian subject; unperformed). Score is lost, acc. to Borroff, American Operas.]

Loehr

1914

Hermann Loehr, Four Indian Songs from The Garden of Kama, by L. Hope.

Mokrejs

1914

John Mokrejs. Miantowana. For voice and piano. Words by Thomas Bailey Aldrich (original poem). Published Chicago: Clayton F. Summy Co., 1914.  [Manuscript at the NYPL]

Nevin

1914

Arthur Finley Nevin, Three Songs.  Boston: White-Smith Co., 1914.


CONTENTS: 1. Egyptian Boat Song. (L. Wallace.) -- 2. My love is fair -- 3. Indian Lullaby.

Orth

1914

Carl Orth, Indian Sketches. Op. 1.  For the piano. Boston & London: Oliver Ditson, 1914.


CONTENTS: 1.  Indian chief -- 2. Winniwawa.

Troyer

1914

Carlos Troyer, Two ZuĖian Melodies. For voice and piano accompaniment. Published Presser, 1914.


CONTENTS: 1. “Awakening at Dawn (a Processianl Chant)” – 2. “Recall of the Tribal Hunters.

Troyer

1914

Carlos Troyer, “Apache Medicine-Chant.” For voice and piano. Published Presser, 1914.

Troyer

1914

Carlos Troyer, “Hunting Song of the Cliffdwellers (of North and South America).” For voice and piano, Presser, 1914.

Waldrop

1914

Uda Waldrop (b. 1885). Nec-Natoma (“Grove-Play” written for the San Francisco Bohemian Club’s summer encampment. Text by J. W. Shields.

Zech

1914

Frederick Zech (1858-1926), Wa-Kin-Yon or The Passing of the Red Man. Opera. Performed San Francisco, 1914. Libretto by Mary Fairweather.

Ayer

1915

Nath. D. Ayer (words and music), Indian Moon. London: B. Feldman and Co., 1914.

Blair

1915

William Blair, The Little Papoose [Song.] Words by C. Myall.  Cincinnati: J. Church, 1915.

Rawlings

1915

Charles Rawlings (d. 1919), Across the Prairies. Indian Ride for pianoforte.  London: W. Paxton and Co., 1915.

Busoni

1915

Ferruccio Busoni, Indianisches Tagebuch (“Indian Diary,”) For piano solo, Op. 47. 1st book, “Vier Klavierstudien über Motive der Rothäute Amerikas” Published Leipzig: Breitkopf u. Härtel, 1915. Reprinted in 1999 as “Indian diary, four studies on motives by Native Americans” for solo piano, Boca Raton, Fla.: Masters Music Publications, 1999.  Also printed in The Complete Elegies, the Six Sonatinas, and Other Original Works for Piano (Mineola, NY: Dover, 1996).

Converse

1915

Frederick Converse, The Peace Pipe. Cantata for baritone, mixed chorus, and orchestra. Text from Longfellow’s Hiawatha. Published Boston: Birchard, 1915.  In 7 sections. Performed at Chautauqua, Chalmers Clifton; Boston “and many other choral performances” (Reis, 1932).

Goldmark

1915

Rubin Goldmark, “From the Old Mission.” Third movement of “Prairie Idylls,” a Suite of Four Pieces for the Piano. Published New York: G. Schirmer.

Hatzan

1915

A. Leon Hatzan (words and music), When the ocean shall cease to roll.. An Indian love song. Toronto: Empire Music and Travel Club, 1915.

Jerome

1915

M. Kay Jerome, Indi—Ana (“Indian Intermezzo”). Instrumental. Published Waterson, Berlin & Snyder, New York.

KetŹlby

1915

Albert William KetŹlby, Silver-Cloud. An Indian maiden's song - Intermezzo.  London: J. H. Larway, 1915.

Lieurance

1915

Thurlow Lieurance, At the Sundown. From the Red Willow Pueblos.  Indian Song for voice and piano. Published Presser, 1915. 5pp.[Both at Sibley]

Lieurance

1915

Thurlow Lieurance, “The Sacrifice. An Indian Mourning Song” for voice and piano. Adapted from The Children of the Sun by J. M. Cavaness. Published: Presser, 1915.

Miller

1915

Horace Alden Miller, From the Forest: Three Ojibway Indian Songs. Published Los Angeles: Musician Publishing Co., 1915.

Otterström

1915

Thorvald Otterström (1868-1942), Indian Song. One of 12 pieces for piano solo called Moods.  Ms. only at Newberry Library. Other pieces are “Old Danish Song,” “Oriental Sketch,” “Bashkir Lullaby,” “Russian Dance,” etc..

Patterson

1915

Harry Patterson, Indian Summer. For three-part Chorus of Women's voices. Op. 42 Hopkins

Skilton

1915

Charles Sanford Skilton (1868-1941), Two Indian Dances for string quartet. Published New York: Carl Fischer, 1917. Dedicated to the Zoellner Quartet and first perf. by them in Jan., 1916.   [Sibley M452.S62]  Orchestrated that summer (1916) while the composer was in residence at the MacDowell Colony in Petersboro, N.H.  First performed in that version in October 1916 by the Minneapolis Symphony under Emil Oberhoffer. Notes in portfolio at New York library: “According to native melodies furnished by R. R. [sic, H.?] de Poe, Chief of the Rogue River Tribe.” Later included the two orchestral dances as Part 1 of Suite Primeval (see 1921).  Arranged for chamber orchestra by Charles J. Roberts, for military band by M.L Lake, and also for theatre orchestra. Two versions exist for solo piano, one of them from 1919 titled “Three Indian Sketches,” q.v. (“Deer Dance” and “War Dance” arr. Carl Preyer). “Deer Dance” arranged for violin and piano by R. Czerwonky. Published New York: C. Fischer, 1923.


CONTENTS: 1. “Deer Dance” and 2. “War Dance.” 

Venth

1915

Carl Venth (1861-1938), “Indian Prologue” [or “Prologue to an Indian Drama.”] For orchestra, 1915. Performed in 1915 by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra under the composer. [Another undated work on Indian subjects may be the same piece:  “The Son of the Winds--Prologue to an Indian Drama” (ms.).]

Allen

1916

Paul Hastings Allen, The Last of the Mohicans. Opera, 1916. Florence, Italy. Published Ricordi as L’ultimo dei mohicani. Based on the novel by J. F. Cooper adapted by Zangarini. Performed Florence, Politico Fiorentino.

Bliss

1916

[Philip] Paul Bliss [Jr.], The Mound-Builders (“An American Cantata” for Chorus, Soprano, Alto and Bass. Published Cincinnati: Willis Music, 1916.

Bornschein

1916

Franz Carl Bornschein (1879-1948), The Phantom Canoe  (“Indian Suite for Symphony Orchestra” in five parts, unpublished. First performance in entirety in Nov. 1916, Baltimore Symphony under Gustav Strube. [Manuscript is in the Fleisher Collection.] In five parts.


CONTENTS: 1, “The Lovers,” -- 2, “The Stake,” -- 3, “The Phantom Canoe,” -- 4, “The Death Song,” -- 5, “The Ghost Fires.”

Bornschein

1916

Franz Carl Bornschein (1879-1948), Onowa, a Legend of the Iroquois Cantata for soprano solo, chorus, and orchestra. Words by Frederick H. Martens. Published Newark, N.J.: Festival Publishing Co., 1916.  50 pp.

Busch

1916

Carl Busch, The Song of Chibiabos. Symphonic poem for orchestra. From the “Song of Hiawatha” by Longfellow. Begun 1903, Ms. dated 1914. Published Copenhagen: W. Hansen, 1924. 37 pp.. First performed Kansas City under the composer’s direction, 1917. 

Busch

1916

Carl Busch, “Indian Lullaby” for voice and piano. Published Ditson, 1916. Undated Ditson publication also exists for an “Indian Lullaby” for chorus with baritone solo.

Cadman

1916

Charles Wakefield Cadman, Thunderbird. Music for the Drama by Norman Bel Geddes,” Op. 62. The play was never performed. In ms only. Full score and parts in Cadman Collection at Pennsylvania State University. Piano Suite arr. 1917 (q.v.). [Geddes’s idea was conceived after a 3-month visit to the Blackfoot Indian Reservation in Montana in the summer of 1912.]

Eames

1916

Henry P. Eames (1872-1950), The Sacred Tree of the Omahas. Pagaent. Libretto by Hartley Burr Alexander. Produced “five times” in June, 1916, at Lincoln, Nebraska. Music excerpted also as an orchestra suite and performed at St. Louis and Chicago. See article in Musical America 24 (June 3, 1916): 40.

Eckhardt

1916

Rudolf Eckhardt, March of the Indian Chieftains, for pianoforte. Op. 20. Boston: B. F. Wood Co., 1916.

Goldmark

1916

Rubin Goldmark, “The Call of the Plains.” No. 1 of Four Compositions for Violin with Piano Accompaniment. Dedicated to Mischa Elman. Published Boston and New York: Carl Fischer, 1916..  [Sibley M221 .G61] Version “for Grand Orchestra,” published New York: Carl Fischer, 1925.  [Sibley M1002 .G619c]

Goodwin

1916

Walter Goodwin, Yo-Kum-Kee.. (My Indian maiden.) Words by Clyde Hager.  New York: Tell Taylor, 1916.

Grunn

1916

Homer Grunn (1880-1944), Indian dance: a dance of the desert: for the piano, [op. 22, no. 2] Published Chicago: Pallma, 1916

Grunn

1916

Grunn, Homer.  Song of the Mesa: Tone Picture of the Desert for piano, Op. 22. Published Los Angeles: Southern California Music, 1916. 5pp..

Hager

1916

Frederick W. Hager, Mulberry moon: an Indian tango. Published New York: Joe Morris Music Co., 1916.

Hardy

1916

G. E. Hardy, An Indian Love Song.. Words by M. England. London: West and Co., 1916.

King

1916

Karl King, Passing of the Red Man. “Indian Characteristic. Written for “Buffalo Bill”’s Wild West shows and dedicated “to my esteemed friend Col. Wm. F. Cody.”  See Michael Masterson’s dissertation on the Wild West shows, pp. 179-88 and the music on p. 319.

Lake

1916

M. L. Lake, “Scalp Dance” from Cherokee and Apache Melodies. For piano or theater orchestra and intended for accompaniment to silent film. Published New York: Carl Fischer.

• “Indian Love Song,” for piano and intended, like “Scalp Dance,” as silent film music.

Lieurance

1916

Thurlow Lieurance, A Sioux Serenade.  “Indian song” for voice and piano with flute ad. lib.  Poem by Alfred Fletcher. Presser, 1916.  [Sibley]

Lieurance

1916

Thurlow Lieurance, By the Weeping Waters for voice and piano; “To Watahwaso.” Presser, 1916. Rainbowland. Indian Song” for voice and piano. Published Presser, 1916.

MacMeekin

1916

J. A. MacMeekin, “Tomahawk.” Indian Intermezzo. San Francisco: J. A. MacMeekin, 1916.

Motzan

1916

Otto Motzan, The Passing Show of 1916. The lyrics by Harold Atteridge.. The music by Otto Motzan [Sigmund Romberg and George Gershwin] The passing show of 1916. 1. Vocal selections. Vocal score.

O’Neill

1916

Norman O’Neill, “Dramatized scenes from Longfellow’s Hiawatha by Valérie Wyngate, with music by Norman O’Neill.” Published London: K. Paul Trench, Truber, and Co., 1916.  95 pp.

Rogates

1916

Pascual de Rogates, Net Zhuacoyotl Huemac. Opera based on Carlos Saintanego’s story of the 7th-century Chichemchan priest. Performed Buenos Aires, 1916.

Romelli

1916

Teresa Romelli, Indian Moon. Written by Leonard Cooke. London: Francis, Day, and Hunter, 1916.

Rosey

1916

George Rosey, “Sachem.” Indian Intermezzo (One-Step). New York: George Rosey Publ., 1916. For Light Orchestra. Conductor and set of parts.

Stamper

1916

David Stamper, Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic. Lyrics by Gene Buck. Music by Dave Stamper Ziegfeld's midnight frolic. 1916. 1. Vocal selections. 

Steele

1916

Herbert Steele, Indian Morn. Intermezzo Romance. For piano solo.  London: Francis, Day, and Hunter, 1916.

Van Lynden

1916

Clari van Lynden, Snowbird.  [Song.] “Indian Reminiscences.”  Theodore B. White. St. Louis: Buck and Lowney, 1916.

Venth

1916

Carl Venth,  “An Indian Pipe,” No. 6 of “Seven Miniatures for Piano at MacDowell’s Resting Place.” Written at the MacDowell colony in Peterborough, N.H., 1916. [Score at Univ. of Texas at Autin.]

Ward

1916

Ernest M. Ward, My Manitou Lou. [Arr. by Madeline Howard]  Chicago: Ward-Howard Music Co., 1916.

Bimboni

1917

Alberto Bimboni, (1882-?). “Songs of the American Indians.” Published New York: G. Schirmer, 1917. English and Indian works for the first 2 songs. 


CONTENTS: 1. “Song of the Sun Dance” (Sioux); words adapted by Frances Densmore from the translation of Robert Higheagle -- 2. “My lover has departed” (Chippewa); words adapted from F. Densmore from the translation of Mary Warren English -- 3. “Red Day” (Sioux); with the original poem by Perry S. Williams and melody from the Frances Densmore -- 4. “Song of the trees” (Chippewa); with the original poem by Perry S. Williams.

Busch

1917

Carl Busch, Two songs from Longfellow’s Hiawatha published separately by Oliver Ditson, 1917. 


CONTENTS: 1. “Hiawatha’s Friends” (from canto 6) -- 2. “Farewell Minnehaha” (from canto 20).

Cadman

1917

Charles Wakefield Cadman, Thunderbird Suite. Piano solo. Published Boston: White-Smith, 1917.  Arranged from the incidental music to Bel Geddes’s play (see 1916). Note in score: “With the exception of the first 2 selections, the music is based upon Blackfeet Indian (Montana) tunes.” 


CONTENTS: 1. “From the Village,” -- 2. “Before the Sunrise,” -- 3. Nuwana’s Love Song”, -- 4. “Night Song,” -- 5. “Wolf Song (War Dance).” 


The first is based on a theme obtained by Alice Fletcher, the second is completely original but seeks to “reflect an Indian idiom.”  The last three are based on Blackfeet tunes obtained by Walter McClintock each of which is included as an emblemmatic preface to the movement.  Composer’s introductions include a forward on the sources for each of the pieces and a short essay “In Defense of Idealization,” which counters the argument against objectifying Indian folk music as a source for composition. Orchestral version (same title) also adapted in 1917 and first perf. in Los Angeles (published Boosey & Hawkes, 1920).

Eppert

1917

Carl E. Eppert (1882-1961?), Kaintuckee. Opera. Performed 1917, North Yakima, Washington. Libretto by F. A. Churchill.